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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 44 44 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 11 11 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 215 BC or search for 215 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, DOLIOLA (search)
ations of the Neronian arcades on the Sacra via (see DOMUS AUREA, p. 168). The floor of the chambers farthest from the arch is 3.25 metres below the ancient pavement of the forum Boarium, and 4.50 metres below the present level of the Via del Velabro. The construction of the galleries is that of the last century of the republic, and they seem to be adapted for an underground prison suggesting the locus saxo consaeptus (Liv. xxii. 57), in which two Gauls and two Greeks were buried alive in 215 B.C. We have several other records of similar human sacrifices in foro Boario, though Gatti, in spite of Pliny's etiam nostra aetas vidit (NH xxviii. 12), doubts if they actually occurred except in effigy. This may also have been the Doliola itself, for the ossa cadaverum said to be preserved here suggest human sacrifices. Von Duhn (Italische Graberkunde i. 416) considers that the probabilities are in favour of a site nearer the temple of Vesta (inasmuch as Livy tells us that the Vestals hid wha
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PISCINA PUBLICA (search)
PISCINA PUBLICA a public bath and swimming pool (Fest. 213), fist mentioned in 215 B.C. (Liv. xxiii. 32. 4), situated in the low ground between the via Appia, the Servian wall, the north-east slope of the Aventine, and the area afterwards occupied by the baths of Caracalla (Liv. Fest. locc. citt.; Cic. ad Q. Fr. iii. 7. I; Jord. ii. 106-107; HJ 183-184). Near it was the headquarters of the lanii piscinenses (CIL vi. 167; cf. Plautus, Pseud. 326-328). This pool later gave its name to the vicus piscinae Publicae (CIL vi. 975; Amm. Marcell. xvii. 4. 14), which led from the south end of the circus Maximus across the depression on the Aventine to the porta Raudusculana. The piscina itself was probably fed by local springs, not by the aqua Appia (LA 234-245 ; cf. Jord. i. I. 447, 458), and had ceased to exist in the second century (Fest. 213), but the name clung to the locality (cf. ad piscinam publicam Hippolyt. philos. ix. 12, p. 552; cf. BC 1914, 353), and it was popularly given to R
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, VENUS ERUCINA, AEDES (search)
VENUS ERUCINA, AEDES a temple on the Capitoline, probably within the area Capitolina, which, together with the temple of MENS (q.v.), was vowed by the dictator Q. Fabius Maximus, in accordance with the instructions of the Sibylline books, after the defeat at Lake Trasumenus in 217 B.C. (Liv. xxii. 9. 10, 10. 10), and dedicated by Fabius as duovir in 215 (Liv. xxiii. 30. 13, 31. 9). The temples of Venus and Mens were separated by a sewer (Liv. xxiii. 31. 9; cf. Varro ap. Philogyr. ad Georg. iv. 265). It is altogether probable that this is the temple known during the empire as aedes Capitolina Veneris, in which Livia dedicated a statue of an infant son of Germanicus (Suet. Cal. 7), and Galba a necklace of precious stones (Suet. Galba 18; Jord. i. 2. 42; Gilb. 111. 101; cf. however, Mommsen, CIL i². p. 331 ; Becker, Top. 404).