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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 44 44 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 11 11 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 215 BC or search for 215 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 44 results in 41 document sections:

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A'ntias 1. L. Valerius Antias, was sent with five ships in B. C. 215 to convey to Rome the Carthaginian ambassadors, who had been captured by the Romans on their way to Philip of Macedonia. (Liv. 23.31.)
Apu'stius 1. L. Apustius, the commander of the Roman troops at Tarentum, B. C. 215. (Liv. 23.38.)
Aristo'machus 3. The leader of the popular party at Croton, in the Hannibalian war, about B. C. 215. At that time nearly all the towns of southern Italy were divided into two parties, the people being in favour of the Carthaginians, and the nobles or senators in favour of the Romans. The Bruttians, who were in alliance with the Carthaginians, had hoped to gain possession of Croton with their assistance. As this had not been done, they determined to make the conquest by themselves. A deserter from Croton informed them of the state of political parties there, and that Aristomachus was ready to surrender the town to them. The Bruttians marched with an army against Croton, and as the lower parts, which were inhabited by the people, were open and easy of access, they soon gained possession of them. Aristomachus, however, as if he had nothing to do with the Bruttians, withdrew to the arx, where the nobles were assembled and defended themselves. The Bruttians in conjunction with the people
Ati'lius 6. L. Atilius, commander of the Roman garrison in Locri, escaped with his troops by sea, when the town was surrendered to Hannibal in B. C. 215. (Liv. 24.1.)
BOSTAR 4. One of the ambassadors sent by Hannibal to Philip of Macedonia in B. C. 215. The ship in which they sailed was taken by the Romans, and the ambassadors themselves sent as prisoners to Rome. (Liv. 23.34.) We are not told whether they obtained their freedom; and consequently it is uncertain whether the Bostar who was governor of Capua with Hanno, in 211, is the same as the preceding. (Liv. 26.5, 12; Appian, Annib. 43.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Cato the Censor (search)
for pure morality, and strict old-fashioned virtue. He was looked upon as the living type and representative of the ideal ancient Roman. His very faults bore the impress of national character, and humoured national prejudice. To the advancement of such a man opposition was vain. In B. C. 195, in the 39th year of his age, he was elected consul with his old friend and patron L. Valerius Flaccus. During this consulship a strange scene took place. peculiarly illustrative of Roman manners. In B. C. 215, at the height of the Punic war, a law had been passed on the rogation of the tribune Oppius, that no woman should possess more than half an ounce of gold, nor wear a garment of divers colours, nor drive a carriage with horses at less distance than a mile from the city, except for the purpose of attending the public celebration of religious rites. Now that Hannibal was conquered; that Rome abounded with Carthaginian wealth; and that there was no longer any necessity for women to contribute
Deino'menes 2. One of the guards of Hieronymus, king of Syracuse, in the plot against whose life he joined. When Hieronymus had marched into Leontini, and had arrived opposite the house where the murderers were posted, Deinomenes, who was close behind him, stopped under pretence of extricating his foot from a knot which confined it, and thus checked the advance of the multitude, and separated the king from his guards. The assassins then rushed on Hieronymus and slew him. (B. C. 215.) His attendants turned their weapons against Deinomenes, but he escaped with a few wounds, and was soon after elected by the Syracusans one of their generals. (Liv. 24.7, 23.) [E.E]
Evander (*Eu)/andros), a Phocian, was the pupil and successor of Lacydes as the head of the Academic School at Athens, about B. C. 215. Evander himself was succeeded by his pupil Hegesinus. Concerning the opinions and writings of this philosopher nothing is known. (D. L. 4.60; Cic. Ac. 2.6.) Several Pythagoreans of the name of Evander, who were natives of Croton, Metapontum, and Leontini, are mentioned by Iamblichus (Vit. Pyth. 36), and a Cretan Evander occurs in Plutarch. (Lysand. 23.) [L.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Flaccus, Fu'lvius 2. Q. Fulvius Flaccus, M. F. Q. N., a son of No. 1, was consul in B. C. 237. He and his colleague, L. Cornelius Lentulus, fought against the Ligurians in Italy, and triumphed over them. In B. C. 224 he was consul a second time. The war in the north of Italy was still going on, and Flaccus and his colleague were the first Roman generals that led their armies across the river Po. The Gauls and Insubrians were reduced to submission in that campaign. In B. C. 215, after having been twice consul, Q. Fulvius Flaccus obtained the city praetorship, a circumstance which Livy thinks worth being recorded. The year before his praetorship, 216, he had been elected pontifex in the place of Q. Aelius Paetus, who had fallen in the battle of Cannae. In his praetorship the senate placed twenty-four ships at his command, to protect the coast in the neighbourhood of the city, and soon after the senate decreed that he should raise 5000 foot and 400 horse, and cause this legion to be car
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Flaccus, Vale'rius 4. P. Valerius Flaccus, was sent in B. C. 218, with Q. Baebius Tamphilus, as ambassador to Spain to remonstrate with Hannibal for attacking Saguntum, and thence proceeded to Carthage to announce the intention of the Romans. if Hannibal should not be checked in his proceedings. In B. C. 215 he commanded as legate a detachment of troops, under the consul. M. Claudius Marcellus, at Nola, and distinguished himself in the battle fought there against Hannibal. Shortly after we find him commanding a Roman squadron of 25 sail off the coast of Calabria, where he discovered the embassy which Hannibal sent to Philip of Macedonia, and got possession of letters and documents containing the terms of the treaty between Hannibal and the king. His fleet was increased in consequence, and he was ordered not only to protect the coast of Italy, but also to watch the proceedings of Macedonia. During the siege of Capua, when Hannibal marched towards Rome, Flaccus gave the prudent advice
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