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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 63 63 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 19 19 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.). You can also browse the collection for 217 BC or search for 217 BC in all documents.

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Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VIII. THE NATURE OF THE TERRESTRIAL ANIMALS., CHAP. 82. (56.)—ANIMALS WHICH ARE TAMED IN PART ONLY. (search)
hey even gnawed the iron; which they also do, by a kind of natural instinct, in the iron forges among the Chalybes. In gold mines, too, their stomachs are opened for this purpose, and some of the metal is always to be found there, which they have pilfered,We have two passages in Livy, B. xxvii. and B. xxx., where gold is said to have been gnawed by mice.—B. so great a delight do they take in stealing! We learn from our Annals, also, that at the siege of Casilinum,See B. iii. c. 9. In B. C. 217, this place was occupied by Fabius with a strong garrison, to prevent Hannibal from passing the Vulturnus; and the following year, after the battle of Cannæ, was occupied by a small body of Roman troops, who, though little more than 1000 in number, withstood the assaults of Hannibal during a protracted siege, until compelled by famine to surrender. by Hannibal, a mouse was sold for two hundred denarii,This sun would be about £ 7.—B. and that the person who sold it perished with hunger, while <
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK XX. REMEDIES DERIVED FROM THE GARDEN PLANTS., CHAP. 100. (24.)—THE COMPOSITION OF THERIACA. (search)
nius speak of Petronius and Dio- dotus, making them different persons; and it is not improbable that the true reading in c. 32 of this Book, is "Petronius et Diodotus." lollas,See end of B. xii. Erasistratus,See end of B. xi. Diagoras,See end of B. xii. Andreas,It is probable that there were several Greek physicians of this name; but the only one of whom anything certain is known is the physician to Ptolemy Philopater, king of Egypt, in whose tent he was killed by Theodotus, the Ætolian, B.C. 217. He was probably the first writer on hydrophobia. Eratosthenes is said to have accused him of plagiarism. Mnesides,See end of B. xii. Epicharmus,It is doubtful if the person of this name to whom Pliny attributes a work on the Cabbage, in cc. 34 and 36 of this Book, was the same individual as Epicharmus of Cos, the Comic poet, born B.C. 540. It has been suggested that the botanical writer was a different personage, the brother of the Comic poet Demologus. Damion,Possibly the same person as the