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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 58 58 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 17 17 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 218 BC or search for 218 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CONCORDIA, AEDES (search)
CONCORDIA, AEDES a temple to Concord on the arx, vowed probably by the praetor L. Manlius in 218 B.C. after he had quelled a mutiny among his troops in Cisalpine Gaul (Liv. xxii. 33. 7; cf. xxvi. 23. 4). It was begun in 217 and dedicated on 5th February, 216 (Liv. xxiii. 21. 7; Hemerol. Praen. ad Non. Feb., Concordiae in Arce ; For the discovery of this fragment of the Fasti Praenestini, see DAP 2. xv. 330. CIL i 2. p. 233, 309; Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 86, Concordiae in Capitolio; Hermes 1875, 288; Jord. i. 2. 112). It was probably on the east side of the arx, and overlooked the great temple of Concord below.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, HERCULES CUSTOS, AEDES (search)
HERCULES CUSTOS, AEDES * a temple of Hercules, near the circus Flaminius, built in accordance with the command of the Sibyl, and dedicated on 4th June (Ov. Fast. vi. 209-212): Altera pars Circi Custode sub Hercule tuta est: quod deus Euboico carmine munus habet. muneris est tempus, qui nonas Lucifer ante est. si titulum quaeris: Sulla probavit opus. The reference to Sulla probably means that Sulla restored an existing temple. In 218 B.C. a supplicatio was decreed ad aedem Herculis (Liv. xxi. 62. 9), and in 189 a statue of the god was placed in aede Herculis (ib. xxxviii. 35. 4). If, as is probable, this aedes is that restored by Sulla, the original temple must have been erected before 218, probably about the time of the erection of the circus Flaminius in 221, of which Hercules was regarded as the guardian. The day of dedication is recorded in the calendars (Fast. Venus. pr. Non. Iun., CIL i'. p. 221: Herc(uli) Magn(o) Custod(i); Vail. pr. Id. Aug. (undoubtedly an error), CIL i. p.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SPES, AEDES (search)
SPES, AEDES a temple in the forum Holitorium, built and dedicated by A. Atilius Calatinus during the first Punic war (Cic. de leg. ii. 28; de nat. deor. ii. 61 (if Spes is to be read here instead of Fides) ; Tac. Ann. ii. 49; HJ 508-509; Rosch. iv. 1296). It was struck by lightning in 218 B.C. (Liv. xxi. 62. 4), burned in 213 and restored the following year by a special commission (Liv. xxv. 7. 6; cf. xxiv. 47. 15-16), and burned again in 31 (Cass. Dio 1. 10. 3:nao\s )*elpi/dos). Germanicus dedicated the temple in 17 A.D. (Tac. Ann. ii. 49), necessarily after a restoration, but it is altogether improbable that Augustus failed to repair the damage of 31 B.C., and it is to him that Frank (who identifies it with the southern temple) attributes the existing structure. In 179 B.C. M. Fulvius built a porticus post Spei a Tiberi ad aedem APOLLINIS MEDICI (q.v.)-so the editors: Frank prefers the MS. reading post Spei ad Tiberim, i.e. the temple of Spes near the Tiber (Liv. xl. 5 . 6; cf.