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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 58 58 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 17 17 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 218 BC or search for 218 BC in all documents.

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Agela'us (*)Age/laos), of Naupactus, was a leading man in the Aetolian state at the time of the Achaean league. He is first mentioned in B. C. 221, when he negociated the alliance between the Illyrian chief Scerdilaidas and the Aetolians. It was through his persuasive speech that Philip of Macedonia and his allies were induced to make peace with the Aetolians (B. C. 218), and he was elected general of the latter in the following year, though his conduct in recommending peace was soon afterwards blamed by his fickle countrymen. (Plb. 4.16, 5.103-107
Alexander (*)Ale/candros), of TRICHONIUM in Aetolia, was commander of the Aetolians in B. C. 218 and 219. He attacked the rear of the army of Philip on his return from Thermus, but the attempt was unsuccessful, and many Aetolians fell. (Plb. 5.13.) [L.
Amphi'damas or AMPHI'DAMUS (*)Amfida/mas, *)Amfi/damos), general of the Eleans in B. C. 218, was taken prisoner by Philip, king of Macedonia, and carried to Olympia, but was set at liberty on his undertaking to bring over his countrymen to Philip's side. But not succeeding in his attempt, he went back to Philip, and is spoken of as defending Aratus against the charges of Apelles. (Plb. 4.75, 84, 86.)
A'nnius 3. T. Annius, a triumvir for founding colonies in Cisalpine Gaul, was obliged by a sudden rising of the Boii to take refuge in Mutina, B. C. 218. (Liv. 21.25.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
s respectively, revolted and defeated the armies sent against them. They were, however, put down in a second campaign, conducted by Antiochus in person, who also added to his dominions the province of Media Atropatene. (B. C. 220.) On his return from his eastern provinces, Antiochus commenced war against Ptolemy Philopator, king of Egypt, in order to obtain Coele-Syria, Phoenicia, and Palestine, which he maintained belonged to the Syrian kingdom. At first he was completely successful. In B. C. 218, he gained possession of the chief towns of Phoenicia, but in the following year (B. C. 217), he was defeated in a great battle fought at Raphia near Gaza, and concluded in consequence a peace with Ptolemy, by which he ceded the provinces in dispute. He was the more anxious to make peace with Ptolemy, as he wished to direct all his forces against Achaeus, who had revolted in Asia Minor. In one campaign he deprived Achaeus of his conquests, and put him to death when he fell into his hands i
Anti'stius 4. M. Antistius, was sent in B. C. 218 to the north of Italy to recall C. Flaminius, the consul elect, to Rome. (Liv. 21.63.)
etolians continued their invasions, and Aratus was unable effectually to check them, till at last Philip took the field as commander of the allied army. The six remaining years of Aratus' life are a mere history of intrigues, by which at different times his influence was more or less shaken with the king. At first he was entirely set aside; and this cannot be wondered at, when his object was to unite Greece as an independent nation, while Philip wished to unite it as subject to himself. In B. C. 218, it appears that Aratus regained his influence by an exposure of the treachery of his opponents; and the effects of his presence were shewn in a victory gained over the combined forces of the Aetolians, Eleans, and Lacedaemonians. In B. C. 217 Aratus was the 17th time chosen general, and every thing, so far as the security of the leagued states was concerned, prospered; but the feelings and objects of the two men were so different, that no unity was to be looked for, so soon as the immedia
Asi'nia Gens plebeian. The Asinii came from Teate, the chief town of the Marrucini (Sil. Ital. 17.453; Liv. Epit. 73; Catull. 12); and their name is derived from asina, which was a cognomen of the Scipios, as asellus was of the Annii and Claudii. The Herius, spoken of by Silius Italicus (l.c.) in the time of the second Punic war, about B. C. 218, was an ancestor of the Asinii; but the first person of the name of Asinius, who occurs in history, is Herius Asinius, in the Marsic war, B. C. 90. [ASINIUS.] The cognomens of the Asinii are AGRIPPA, CELER, DENTO, GALLUS. POLLIO, SALONINUS. The only cognomens which occur on coins, are GALLUS and POLLIO. (Eckhel, v. p. 144.)
. C. 226), he had made himself master of the whole of Asia Minor west of mount Taurus. Seleucus immediately attacked him, and by B. C. 221 Achaeus [ACHAEUS] had reduced his dominions to the limits of Pergamus itself. (Plb. 4.48.) On the breaking out of the war between the Rhodians and Byzantines (B. C. 220), Attalus took part with the latter, who had done their utmost to bring about a peace between him and Achaeus (Plb. 4.49), but he was unable to render them any effective assistance. In B. C. 218, with the aid of a body of Gaulish mercenaries, he recovered several cities in Aeolis and the neighbouring districts, but was stopped in the midst of his successes by an eclipse of the sun, which so alarmed the Gauls, that they refused to proceed. (Plb. 5.77, 78.) In B. C. 216, he entered into an alliance with Antiochus the Great against Achaeus. (5.107.) In B. C. 211, he joined the alliance of the Romans and Aetolians against Philip and the Achaeans. (Liv. 26.24.) In 209, he was made prae
. C. 226), he had made himself master of the whole of Asia Minor west of mount Taurus. Seleucus immediately attacked him, and by B. C. 221 Achaeus [ACHAEUS] had reduced his dominions to the limits of Pergamus itself. (Plb. 4.48.) On the breaking out of the war between the Rhodians and Byzantines (B. C. 220), Attalus took part with the latter, who had done their utmost to bring about a peace between him and Achaeus (Plb. 4.49), but he was unable to render them any effective assistance. In B. C. 218, with the aid of a body of Gaulish mercenaries, he recovered several cities in Aeolis and the neighbouring districts, but was stopped in the midst of his successes by an eclipse of the sun, which so alarmed the Gauls, that they refused to proceed. (Plb. 5.77, 78.) In B. C. 216, he entered into an alliance with Antiochus the Great against Achaeus. (5.107.) In B. C. 211, he joined the alliance of the Romans and Aetolians against Philip and the Achaeans. (Liv. 26.24.) In 209, he was made prae
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