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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 53 53 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 24 24 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University). You can also browse the collection for 220 BC or search for 220 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 11 (search)
n a time from Greece on account of an epidemic, whileB.C. 205 there was as yet no treaty of alliance; that at present on account of a joint war against Philip they had already entered into friendly relations with King Attalus. Thinking that he would do what he could for the sake of the Roman people, they decided to send ambassadors to him. These were Marcus Valerius Laevinus, who had been twice consulCf. XXX. xxiii. 5. One list of the consuls gives Laevinus a first consulship in 220 B.C.; Chronogr. an. 354 in C.I.L. I. p. 524. He may have been a suffectus in 208 B.C. (end of the year, both consuls being dead; XXVII. xxxiii. 7). In Livy a new man when elected in 211 B.C.; XXVI. xxii. 12. and had held a command in Greece, Marcus Caecilius Metellus, an ex-praetor, Servius Sulpicius Galba, an ex-aedile, and two former quaestors, Gnaeus Tremelius Flaccus and Marcus Valerius Falto. For them they voted five quinqueremes,See XXVIII. xxx. 11 and note. Whatever may have been th
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 19 (search)
eing scattered in the open sea, were captured by the Roman fleet which was off Sardinia. Such were the events on land and sea in that part of Italy which borders upon the Alps. The consul Gaius Servilius, who had accomplished nothing that deserves mention in his province of Etruria and in Gaul —for he had advanced into that country as well-rescued from slavery after fifteenB.C. 203 years his father Gaius Servilius and Gaius Lutatius,Son of the victor in 242, he had been consul in 220 B.C.; Zonaras VIII. xx. 10. who had been captured near the village of TannetumThey were seized, as Livy himself has it, near Mutina (Modena), but their Gallic captors were unsuccessfully pursued northwestward as far as Tannetum (half-way between Parma and Reggio Emilia). Cf. XXI. xxv. 3, 13; xxvi. 2; XXVII. xxi. 10; Polybius III. xl. 9-13. by the Boii. Upon that he returned to Rome escorted by his father on one side and Catulus on the other, gaining distinction for an act that was personal