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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 20 20 Browse Search
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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
st the Cantabrians. About this time jealousy arose between him and his brother-in-law Marcellus, the nephew of Augustus, and who seemed to be destined as his successor. Augustus, anxious to prevent differences that might have had serious consequences for him, sent Agrippa as proconsul to Syria. Agrippa of course left Rome, but he stopped at Mitylene in the island of Lesbos, leaving the government of Syria to his legate. The apprehensions of Augustus were removed by the death of Marcellus in B. C. 23, and Agrippa immediately returned to Rome, where he was the more anxiously expected, as troubles had broken out during the election of the consuls in B. C. 21. Augustus resolved to receive his faithful friend into his own family, and accordingly induced him to divorce his wife Marcella, and marry Julia, the widow of Marcellus and the daughter of Augustus by his third wife, Scribonia. (B. C. 21.) In B. C. 19, Agrippa went into Gaul. He pacified the turbulent natives, and constructed four g
e others under legati Caesaris, sometimes also called propraetores, whom he appointed at any time he pleased. He declined all honours and distinctions which were calculated to remind the Romans of kingly power; he preferred allowing the republican forms to continue, in order that he might imperceptibly concentrate in his own person all the powers which had hitherto been separated. He accepted, however, the name of Augustus, which was offered to him on the proposal of L. Munatius Plancus. In B. C. 23 he entered upon his eleventh consulship, but laid it down immediately afterwards ; and, after having also declined the dictatorship, which was offered him by the senate, he accepted the imperium proconsulare and the tribunitia potestas for life, by which his inviolability was legally established, while by the imperium proconsulare he became the highest authority in all the Roman provinces. When in B. C. 12 Lepidus, the pontifex maximus, died, Augustus, on whom the title of chief pontiff had
the accomplishments of her rank and station were diversified by the labours of the loom and the needle. (Suet. Aug. 73.) A daily register was kept of her studies and occupations; her words, actions, and associates were jealously watched ; and her father gravely reproached L. Vinicius, a youth of unexceptionable birth and character, for addressing Julia at Baiae (Suet. Aug. 63, 64). She married, B. C. 25, M. Marcellus, her first cousin, the son of Octavia (D. C. 53.27), and, after his death, B. C. 23, without issue, M. Vipsanius Agrippa [AGRIPPA, M. VIPSANIUS] (D. C. 53.30, 54.6; Plut. Ant. 87; Suet. Aug. 63), by whom she had three sons, C. and L. Caesar, and Agrippa Postumus, and two daughters, Julia and Agrippina. She accompanied Agrippa to Asia Minor in B. C. 17, and narrowly escaped drowning in the Scamander. (Nic. Dam. p. 225, ed. Coray.; J. AJ 16.2.2.) After Agrippa's death in B. C. 12, Augustus meditated taking a husband for his daughter from the equestrian order, and C. Proculei
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
y the magnificence of the games which he exhibited, on occasion of which the whole forum was covered over with an awning, as well as the theatres themselves, which were hung with splendid tapestries. Augustus himself did every thing in his power to contribute to the effect of this display, in which Octavia also bore an importart part. (Dio Cass. Dii. 28, 31; Pro pert. 3.18. 13-20; Plin. H. N 19.1.) But Marcellus was not destined to survive the year of this his first office: in the autumn of B. C. 23, almost before the end of the games and shows, he was attacked by the disease, of which he died shortly after at Baiae, notwithstanding all the skill and care of the celebrated physician Antonius Musa. He was in the 20th year of his age (Propert. Ml.c.), and was thought to have given so much promise of future excellence, that his death was mourned as a public calamity; and the grief of Augustus, as well as that of his mother, Octavia, was for a time unbounded. On the other hand, his untim
Mariamne 2. Daughter of Simon, a priest at Jerusalem. Herod the Great was struck with her beauty and married her, B. C. 23, at the same time raising her father to the high-priesthood, whence he deposed Jesus, the son of Phabes, to make room for him. In B. C. 5, Mariamne being accused of being privy to the plot of ANTIPATER and Pheroras against Herod's life, he put her away, deprived Simon of the high-priesthood, and erased from his will the name of Herod Philip, whom she had borne him, and whom he had intended as the successor to his dominions after Antipater. (Jos. Ant. 15.9.3, 17.1.2, 4.2, 18.5.1, 19.6.2, Bell. Jud. 1.28.2, 30.7.)
ers (frater patruelis, and frater). Murena was sent by Augustus, in B. C. 25, to attack the Salassi in the Alps: he reduced the people to obedience, sold the male prisoners for slaves, and the chief part of the territory was distributed among Praetorian soldiers, who founded the town of Augusta, now Aosta, in the province of Aosta, one of the eight divisions of the continental dominion of the king of Sardinia (D. C. 53.25; Strab. p. 206, ed. Casaub.). Murena was named consul suffectus for B. C. 23. In B. C. 22 he was involved in the conspiracy of Fannius Caepio, and was condemned to death and executed, notwithstanding the intercession of Proculeius and Terentia, the sister of Murena. Dio Cassius (54.3), when speaking of the death of Murena, calls him Licinius Murena, though he had already (53.25) called him Terentius Varro. Such confusion is common enough with the Roman writers, when they are speaking of adopted persons. Horace (Hor. Carm. 2.10) addresses Murena by the name of Licini
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
517). a freedman, an assertion which some persons, who are over-jealous about the dignity of the medical profession among the Romans, have controverted. When the emperor was seriously ill, and had been made worse by a hot regimen and treatment, B. C. 23, Antonins Musa succeeded in restoring him to health by means of cold bathing and cooling drinks, for which service he received from Augustus and the senate a large sum of money and the permission to wear a gold ring, and also had a statue erecten. Nat. 19.38, 25.38, 29.5.) He seems to have been attached to this mode of treatment, to which Horace alludes l.c.), but failed when he applied it to the case of M. Marcellus, who died under his care a few months after the recovery of Augustus, B. C. 23. (Dio Cass. l.c.) He is by some scholars supposed to be the person to whom one of Virgil's epigrams is inscribed (Catal. 13); but it is hardly likely, that, in a complimentary poem addressed to so eminent a physician, no mention whatever should
Nestor 3. An academic philosopher, preceptor of Marcellus, son of Octavia. Marcellus died B. C. 23. (Strab. lib. xiv. p. 675; Clinton, F. H. vol. iii. pp. 237, 548.) [W.M.G]
(D. C. 54.35; Senec. ad Polyb. 34.) Octavia had five children, three by Marcellus, a son and two daughters, and two by Antony, both daughters. Her son, M. Marcellus, was adopted by Octavianus, and was destined to be his successor, but died in B. C. 23. [MARCELLUS, No. 15.] Of her two daughters by her former husband, one was married to Ms. Agrippa, and subsequently to Julus Antonius [MARCELLA], but of the fate of the other daughter we have no information. The descendants of her two daughters be a mistake; for Vitruvius, who certainly did not write his work so early as this year, still speaks (3.2.5, ed. Schneider) of the Porticus Metelli, and we learn from Plutarch (Plut. Marc. 30) that the dedication at all events of the Porticus did not take place till after the death of M. Marcellus in B. C. 23. (Vell. 1.11; D. C. 49.43; Plut. l.c. ; Liv. Epit. 138; Suet. Aug. 29; Plin. Nat. 36.4. s. 5; Festus, p. 178, ed. Müller; Becker, Handbuch der Römischen Alterthümer, vol. i. pp. 608-61
Piso 22. CN. CALFURNIUS CN. F. CN. N. PISO, consul B. C. 23, was, in all probability, the son of No. 21. He belonged to the high aristocratical party, and was naturally of a proud and imperious temper. He fought against Caesar in Africa, in B. C. 46, and after the death of the dictator, joined Brutus and Cassius. He was subsequently pardoned, and returned to Rome; but he disdained to ask Augustus for any of the honours of the state, and was, without solicitation, raised to the consulship in B. ristocratical party, and was naturally of a proud and imperious temper. He fought against Caesar in Africa, in B. C. 46, and after the death of the dictator, joined Brutus and Cassius. He was subsequently pardoned, and returned to Rome; but he disdained to ask Augustus for any of the honours of the state, and was, without solicitation, raised to the consulship in B. C. 23. (Tac. Ann. 2.43, Bell. Afr. 18.) This Cn. Piso appears to be the same as the Cn. Piso spoken of by Valerius Maximus (6.2.4).
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