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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 14 14 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 230 BC or search for 230 BC in all documents.

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Aristo'machus 2. Succeeded Aristippus II. in the tyranny of Argos, apparently towards the end of the reign of Demetrius. (B. C. 240-230.) He seems to have been related to some of his predecessors in the tyranny of Argos. (Plb. 2.59.) After the death of Demetrius, B. C. 229, he resigned his power, as Lydiades had done before, and several others did now, for the influence of Macedonia in Peloponnesus had nearly ceased, and the Aetolians were allied with the Achaeans. Aristomachus had been persuaded to this step by Aratus, who gave him fifty talents that he might be able to pay off and dismiss his mercenaries. Argos now joined the Achaean league, and Aristomachus was chosen strategus of the Achaeans for the year B. C. 227. (Plut. Arat. 35; Plb. 2.44; Paus. 2.8.5 ; Plut. Cleom. 4.) In this capacity he undertook the command in the war against Cleomenes of Sparta, but he seems to have been checked by the jealousy of Aratus, in consequence of which he afterwards deserted the cause of the Ac
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Ariston (), literary. (search)
287) takes it for granted. Ariston 2. A friend of Aristotle, the philosopher, to whom he is said to have addressed some letters. (D. L. 5.27.) Ariston 3. A Peripatetic philosopher and a native of the island of Ceos, where his birthplace was the town of Julis, whence he is sometimes called *Kei=os and sometimes *)Ioulih/ths. He was a pupil of Lycon (D. L. 5.70, 74), who was the successor of Straton as the head of the Peripatetic school, about B. C. 270. After the death of Lycon, about B. C. 230, Ariston succeeded him in the management of the school. Ariston, who was, according to Cicero (de Fin. 5.5), a man of taste and elegance, was yet deficient in gravity and energy, which prevented his writings acquiring that popularity which they otherwise deserved, and may have been one of the causes of their neglect and loss to us. In his philosophical views, if we may judge from the scanty fragments still extant, he seems to have followed his master pretty closely. Works Works mention
Ariston 3. A Peripatetic philosopher and a native of the island of Ceos, where his birthplace was the town of Julis, whence he is sometimes called *Kei=os and sometimes *)Ioulih/ths. He was a pupil of Lycon (D. L. 5.70, 74), who was the successor of Straton as the head of the Peripatetic school, about B. C. 270. After the death of Lycon, about B. C. 230, Ariston succeeded him in the management of the school. Ariston, who was, according to Cicero (de Fin. 5.5), a man of taste and elegance, was yet deficient in gravity and energy, which prevented his writings acquiring that popularity which they otherwise deserved, and may have been one of the causes of their neglect and loss to us. In his philosophical views, if we may judge from the scanty fragments still extant, he seems to have followed his master pretty closely. Works Works mentioned by Diogenes Laertius Diogenes Laertius (7.163), after enumerating the works of Ariston of Chios, says, that Panaetius and Sosicrates attributed
Ba'rbula 3. M. Aemilius Barbula, L. F. Q. N., son of No. 2, was consul in B. C. 230, and had in conjunction with his colleague the conduct of the war against the Ligurians. (Zonar. 8.19.) Zonaras says (l.c.), that when the Carthaginians heard of the Ligurian war, they resolved to march against Rome, but that they relinquished their design when the consuls came into their country, and received the Romans as friends. This is evidently a blunder, and must in all probability be referred to the Gauls, who, as we learn from Polybius (2.21), were in a state of great ferment about this time owing to the lex Flaininia, which had been passed about two years previously, B. C. 232, for the division of the Picentian land.
Flamini'nus 4. T. Quintius Flamininus. As he is said to have been about thirty-three years old in B. C. 196, he must have been born about B. C. 230. (Liv. 33.33.) He is called by Aurelius Victor (De Vir. Illustr. 51) a son of C. Flaminius, who fell in the battle on Lake Trasimenus; but this statement arises from a confusion of the Flaminia gens with the family of the Flaminini. [FLAMINIA GENS.] He was the brother of L. Quintius Flamininus [No. 3], and is first mentioned in history in B. C. 201, when he was appointed one of the ten commissioners to measure and distribute the public land in Samnium and Appulia among the veterans who had fought under P. Scipio in Africa, against the Carthaginians, and the year after he was one of the triunvirs appointed to complete the number of colonists at Venusia, which had been greatly reduced during the Hannibalian war. In B. C. 199 he was quaestor, and towards the expiration of his office he sued for the consulship. He was opposed by two tribunes
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ius Maximus, Q. F. Q. N., with the agnomens VERRUCOSUs, from a wart on his upper lip, OVICULA, or the Lamb, from the mildness or apathy of his temper (Plut. Fab. 1; comp. Varr. R. R. 2.11). and CUNCTATOR, from his caution in war, grandson of Fabius Gurges, and, perhaps, son of the preceding, was consul for the first time in B. C. 233. Liguria was his province, and it afforded him a triumph (Fasti) and a pretext for de.licating a temple to Honour. (Cic. de Nat. Deor. 2.23.) He was censor in B. C. 230; consul a second time in 228; opposed the agrarian law of C. Flaminius in 227 [FLAMINIUS, No. 1]; was dictator for holding the comitia in 221, and in 218 legatus from the senate to Carthage, to demand reparation for the attack on Saguntnm. In . 100.217, immediately after the defeat at Thrasymenus, Fabius was appointed dictator, or rather, since no consul was at hahd to nominate him, pro-dictator. From this period, so long as the war with Hanni bal was merely defensive, Fabius became the le
Octa'via Gens celebrated in history on account of the emperor Augustus belonging to it. It was a plebeian gens, and is not mentioed till the year B. C. 230), when Cn. Octavius Rufus obtained the quaestorship. This Cn. Octavius left two sons, Cneius and Caius. The descendants of Cneius held many of the higher magistracies, and his son obtained the consulship in B. C. 165; but the descendants of Caius, from whom the emperor Augustus sprang, did not rise to any importance, but continued simple equites, and the first of them, who was enrolled among the senators, was the father of Augustus. The gens originally came from the Volscian town of Velitrae, where there was a street in the most frequented part of the town, and likewise an altar, both bearing the name of Octavius (Suet. Aug. 1, 2; Vell. 2.59; D. C. 45.1). This is all that can be related with certainty respecting the history of this gens; but as it became the fashion towards the end of the republic for the Roman nobles to trace the
Octavius 1. Cn. Octavius Rufus, quaestor about B. C. 230, may be regarded as the founder of the family. [OCTAVIA GENS.] Suetonius calls him Caius but this is probably a mistake, as Drumann has remarked, since the name of his eldest son was Cneius, and it was the rule among the Romans for the eldest son to inherit the praenomen of his father. (Suet. Aug. 2.)
Pana'retus (*Pana/retos), a pupil of Arcesilans, the founder of the new Academy. He was noted for the excessive slightness of his person. He was intimate with Ptolemy Energetes (about B. C. 230), from whom he is said to have received twelve talents yearly. (Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. iii. p. 181; Athen. 12.552c.; Aelian, H. V. 10.6.) [W.M.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Aemi'lius Macedonicus (search)
Paulus, Aemi'lius or Aemi'lius Macedonicus 4. L. Aemilius Paulus, L. F. M. N., afterwards surnamed MACEDONICUS, was the son of No. 3, and the most distinguished member of his family. He was born about B. C. 230 or 229, since at the time of his second consulship, B. C. 168, he was upwards of sixty years of age. He was one of the best specimens of the high Roman nobles. He inherited all the aristocratical prejudices of his father, would not condescend to court and flatter the people for the offices of the state, maintained with strictness severe discipline in the army, was deeply skilled in the lore of the augurs, to whose college he belonged, and maintained throughout life a pure and unspotted character, notwith-standing the temptations to which his integrity was exposed on his conquest of Macedonia. His name is first mentioned in B. C. 194, when he was appointed one of the three commissioners for founding a colony at Croton. Two years afterwards, B. C. 192, he was elected curule aedi
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