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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 19 19 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University). You can also browse the collection for 241 BC or search for 241 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 23 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 13 (search)
ictory shifted in the previous Punic WarRoman War would seem to us better suited to a speaker addressing Carthaginians. Livy here prefers the Roman standpoint. very many of us are alive to remember. Never have our fortunes seemed more favourable on land and sea than they were before the consulship of Gaius Lutatius and Aulus Postumius. But in the consulship of Lutatius and Postumius we were utterly defeated off the Aegates Islands.It was this defeat which brought the previous war to an end, 241 B.C. And if now also-may the gods avert the omen! —fortune shall shift to any extent, do you hope that at the time of our defeat we shall have a peace which no one gives us now when we are victorious? For myself, if some one is about to bring up the question either of offering peace to the enemy or of accepting it, I know what opinion to express. But if you are raising the question of Mago's demands, I do not think it to the point to send those things to victors, and I think itB.C. 2
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 24 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 7 (search)
ce and into a crowd which rejoiced in its freedom, some to Syracuse to forestall the designs of Adranodorus and the other supporters of the king. In the unsettled state of affairs Appius Claudius, seeing a warB.C. 215 beginning near at hand, informed the senate by letter that Sicily was being won over to the Carthaginian people and Hannibal. For his own part, to meet the schemes of the Syracusans, he concentrated all his garrisons on the frontier between the province and the kingdom.In 241 B.C. Hiero as a faithful ally for 22 years was allowed to keep the eastern end of the island (about one-fourth, and not including Messana). At the end of that year Quintus FabiusThe Delayer, consul this year and the next (five times in all), dictator in 217 B.C. by the authority of the senate fortified and garrisoned Puteoli, which as a commercial centre had grown in population during the war. Then, while on his way to Rome to hold the elections, he proclaimed them for the first date av