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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 19 19 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 4 4 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 1-2 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University). You can also browse the collection for 241 BC or search for 241 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 28 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 41 (search)
But since Hannibal as an enemy with army intact is occupying Italy for the fourteenth year, will you be dissatisfied with your fame, Publius Cornelius, if in your consulship you shall have driven out of Italy the enemy who has caused us so many losses, so many disasters, and if you shall have the distinction of finishing the present war, just as Gaius Lutatius had that of ending the former Punic war?Cf. Periocha 19 fin.; Polybius I. lix.-lxi for the naval victory off the Aegates Islands, 241 B.C.; XXII. xiv. 13; XXIII. xiii. 4. Unless Hamilcar is to be rated above Hannibal as a general, or that war above this one, or unless that victory was greater and moreB.C. 205 famous than this one is to be, if only it be our good fortune to win in your consulship. Would you rather have dragged Hamilcar away from Drepana or down from EryxNow Monte San Giuliano, 2465 ft. It had a famous temple of Aphrodite, whose cult was presumably of Phoenician origin. Cf. XXI. x. 7; xli. 6 ff.; Pol
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 23 (search)
ot merely the Alps but even the Ebro without orders from the senate, and on his own responsibility had waged war not only on the Romans but before that upon the Saguntines also. The senate and the Carthaginian people, they claimed, had a treaty with the Romans which in any fair judgment was to that day unbroken; consequently they had no other instructions than to beg permission to abide by the last peace-treaty, made with Gaius Lutatius.As in XXI. xix. 2 f. Livy connects the treaty of 241 B.C., ratified in the consulship of Quintus Lutatius Cerco, logically with the naval victory won by his brother Gaius Lutatius Catulus at the very end of his year of office (242). Polybius does the same, I. lxii. 7. Below, xliv. 1 is more exact. The brothers shared in the organization of this first province; Zonaras VIII. xvii. 7. When the praetor, following traditional practice, had given the senators permission to ask any question of the envoys if any one was so disposed, and older members, wh
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 30 (search)
hers requested. But by setting no limit to his successB.C. 202 and not reining in an unruly fortune, the higher he had climbed the more terribly did he fall. "It belongs, to be sure, to the giver of peace, not to the suitor, to name the terms. But possibly we may not be unworthy to impose a penalty upon ourselves. We do not reject the condition that all the possessions for which we went to war shall be yours —Sicily, Sardinia,Sicily had been lost by Carthage in the peace of 241 B.C., Sardinia three years later. Unsuccessful attempts to recover them in the present war, however, justify mention of both here. Spain, and any islands existing in all the sea between Africa and Italy. Let us Carthaginians, confined by the coasts of Africa, behold you ruling under your authority even foreign countries by land and sea,Nothing is said of Scipio's other demands in xvi. 10 ff., including a heavy indemnity. since that has been the will of the gods. I would not deny that, on a