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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 19 19 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 241 BC or search for 241 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, IANUS QUADRIFRONS, TEMPLUM (search)
IANUS QUADRIFRONS, TEMPLUM erected by Domitian in the forum Transitorium (Mart. x. 28. 3-6; xi. 4. 5-6; Serv. Aen. vii. 607; Lydus, de mens. iv. I; Macrob. i. 9. 13), in which he placed the four-faced statue that was said to have been brought to Rome from Falerii in 241 B.C. The shrine was square with doors on each side, and the statue of the god was said to look out on four forums (Mart. loc. cit.), i.e. the fora Romanum, Augustum, Pacis, Transitorium. It is not known whether this four-faced statue from Falerii had anything to do with the Roman Janus or not, or whether it had been housed in a shrine before Domitian's time. It was standing in the sixth century (Lydus, loc. cit.; Jord. i. 2. 347, 450; WR 106; Rosch. ii. 25-26; Mem. L. 3. xi. 26-32; Burchett, Janus in Roman Life and Cult, Menasha, Wis. 1918, 40).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, MINERVA CAPTA (MINERVIUM) (search)
s that the shrine was standing in the second century. An inscription (CIL vi. 524) found on the Caelian may also refer to it, and a statue of Minerva in alabaster found near SS. Quattro Coronati, now in the Museo delle Terme, is attributed to it (NS 1926, 61). Ovid gives four explanations (Fast. iii. 839-848) of the epithet Capta, of which only one has any probability (843-844: an quia perdomitis ad nos captiva Faliscis I venit ? et hoc ipsum littera prisca docet). If this be true, the shrine was erected after the destruction of Falerii in 241 B.C. The terms parva delubra and Minervium should indicate that this shrine was not an aedes sacra but only a sacellum. If so, Ovid's statement (see above) that the day of dedication was 19th March is an error, due to the confusion of this sacellum-which would have no natale marked on the calendar-with the temple of Minerva on the Aventine (HJ 226-227; Rosch. ii. 2984-2985; WR 253; Gilb. ii. 233-235, and other literature cited in these places).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, VESTA, AEDES (search)
rom Troy (Ov. Trist. iii. I. 29; Dionys. ii. 66), and other sacra (Dionys. loc. cit.), which were kept in a secret recess called the penus Vestae (Fest. 250: penus vocatur intumus in aede Vestae tegetibus Saeptus; Serv. Aen. iii. 12; cf. Fest. 158, 161; Altm. 59-60), but no statue of the goddess herself (Ov. Fast. vi. 295-298; see AEDICULA VESTAE, S. ATRIUM VESTAE, ad fin.). This temple was undoubtedly burned when the Gauls sacked the city in 390 B.C. (Liv. v. 42; Plut. Cam. 21), and again in 241 when Caecilius Metellus rescued the Palladium at the cost of his sight, which was miraculously restored (Liv. ep. 19; Oros. iv. ii. 9; Ov. Fast. vi. 437-454; Dionys. ii. 66; Plin. NH vii. 141; Val. Max. i. 4. 5). In 210 it was saved from burning by the devotion of thirteen slaves (Liv. xxvi. 27), and again in 14 it was threatened and the sacra removed (Cass. Dio liv. 24). In the great fire of 64 A.D. it was burned, but soon restored, probably by Nero (Tac. Ann. xv. 41; Hist. i. 43; cf. Cohen
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
undation of Temple of Aesculapius, 2, 282. 287Assembly meets in Aesculetum, 3. 281Via Appia prolonged to Tarentum, 559. 272Temple of Consus on Aventine, 141. Anio Vetus begun, 12. 268Temple of Tellus vowed, 511. 267of Pales, 38x. 264of Vortumnus, 584. Via Appia prolonged to Brundusium, 559. 260(after). Columnae of Duilius, 134. Temple of Janus in Foro Holitorio, 277. 259of Tempestates, 511. 255Columna rostrata of M. Aemilius Paullus, 134. 254 or 250Temple of Fides on Capitol, 209. 241Temple of Vesta burnt, 557. Statue of Janus brought from Falerii, 280. Temple of Minerva Capta (?), 344. 241-220Institution of the Argei, 51. 240 (238)Temple of Flora, 209. 238Clivus Publicius built and paved, 124. Temple of Iuppiter Libertas on Aventine, 297. 234of Honos, 258. 231Shrine of Fons, 210. 221Circus Flaminius, 111. 220 (ca.)Temple of Hercules Custos in Circus Flaminius, 252. Via Flaminia, 562. 217of Concord on Arx, 54, I137. Temples of Mens and Venus Erucina vowe