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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 4 4 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for 251 BC or search for 251 BC in all documents.

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Polybius, Histories, book 1, The Carthaginians Prosperous (search)
us. Thence they weighed anchor for Rome, and rashly ventured upon the open sea-line as the shortest; but while on their voyage they once more encountered so terrible a storm that they lost more than a hundred and fifty ships. The Romans after this misfortune, though they are eminently persistent in carrying out their undertakings, yet owing to the severity and frequencyB. C. 252. of their disasters, now yielded to the force of circumstances and refrained from constructing another fleet. B. C. 251. Coss. Lucius Caecilius Metellus, G. Furius Pacilus. All the hopes still left to them they rested upon their land forces: and, accordingly, they despatched the Consuls Lucius Caecilius and Gaius Furius with their legions to Sicily; but they only manned sixty ships to carry provisions for the legions. The fortunes of the Carthaginians had in their turn considerably improved owing to the catastrophes I have described. They now commanded the sea without let or hindrance, since the Romans had aba
Polybius, Histories, book 1, Roman Victory at Panormus (search)
Roman Victory at Panormus Meanwhile Hasdrubal noticed the terror displayed by B. C. 251. the Romans whenever they had lately found themselves in the presence of the enemy. He learnt also that one of the Consuls had departed and gone to Italy, and that Caecilius was lingering in Panormus with the other half of the army, with the view of protecting the corn-crops of the allies just then ripe for the harvest. Skirmishing at Panormus. He therefore got his troops in motion, marched out, and encamped on the frontier of the territory of Panormus. Caecilius saw well enough that the enemy had become supremely confident, and he was anxious to draw him on; he therefore kept his men within the walls. Hasdrubal imagined that Caecilius dared not come out to give him battle. Elated with this idea, he pushed boldly forward with his whole army and marched over the pass into the territory of Panormus. But though he was destroying all the standing crops up to the very walls of the town, Caecilius was n
Polybius, Histories, book 4, Character of Aratus (search)
in intrigue, stratagem, and laying plots against a foe, and in bringing them to a successful termination by personal endurance and courage, he was pre-eminent. Many clear instances of these qualities may be found; but none more convincing than the episodes of the capture of Sicyon and Mantinea, of the expulsion of the Aetolians from Pellene, and especially of the surprise of the Acrocorinthus.The capture of Sicyon and expulsion of the tyrant Nicocles was the earliest exploit of Aratus, B. C. 251. Plutarch, Arat. 4-9. The taking of the Acrocorinthus from the Macedonian garrison was in B. C. 23, ib. ch. 19-24. For the affair at Pellene see ib. 31. The capture of Mantinea was immediately after a defeat by Cleomenes. See Plutarch, Cleom 5. On the other hand whenever he attempted a campaign in the field, he was slow in conception and timid in execution, and without personal gallantry in the presence of danger. The result was that the Peloponnese was full of trophies which marked reverses