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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 7 7 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Polybius, Histories, book 1, The Carthaginians Prosperous (search)
flight than anything else. When they reached Sicily and had made the promontory of Lilybaeum they cast anchor at Panormus. Thence they weighed anchor for Rome, and rashly ventured upon the open sea-line as the shortest; but while on their voyage they once more encountered so terrible a storm that they lost more than a hundred and fifty ships. The Romans after this misfortune, though they are eminently persistent in carrying out their undertakings, yet owing to the severity and frequencyB. C. 252. of their disasters, now yielded to the force of circumstances and refrained from constructing another fleet. B. C. 251. Coss. Lucius Caecilius Metellus, G. Furius Pacilus. All the hopes still left to them they rested upon their land forces: and, accordingly, they despatched the Consuls Lucius Caecilius and Gaius Furius with their legions to Sicily; but they only manned sixty ships to carry provisions for the legions. The fortunes of the Carthaginians had in their turn considerably improved o
Polybius, Histories, book 10, His Birth and Education (search)
His Birth and Education Philopoemen, then, to begin with, was of good birth, Birth, parentage, and education of Philopoemen b. B.C. 252 descended from one of the noblest families in Arcadia. He was also educated under that most distinguished Mantinean, Cleander, who had been his father's friend before, and happened at that time to be in exile. When he came to man's estate he attached himself to Ecdemus and Demophanes, who were by birth natives of Megalopolis, but who having been exiled by the tyrant, and having associated with the philosopher Arcesilaus during their exile, not only set their own country free by entering into an intrigue against Aristodemus the tyrant, but also helped in conjunction with Aratus to put down Nicocles, the tyrant of Sicyon. On another occasion also, on the invitation of the people of Cyrene, they stood forward as their champions and preserved their freedom for them. Such were the men with whom he passed his early life; and he at once began to show a sup