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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 14 14 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 264 BC or search for 264 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 44 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 16 (search)
nstruction of public works, Titus Sempronius, out of the funds assigned to him, bought for the state the house of Publius Africanus behind the Old Shops in the direction of the statue of Vortumnus, as well as the butcher's stalls and the shops adjacent, and saw to the construction of the basilica which afterward received the name of Sempronian.Africanus was the father-in-law of the censor. The Old Shops had been built in 209 B.C., cf. XXVII. xi. 16, and were so called to distinguish them from some built in 194 B.C. The bronze statue of the Etruscan god Vortumnus stood in the Vicus Tuscus some distance south-west of the Forum, but visible from it; the statue is mentioned by Cicero, in Verrem II. I. 59, 154, and Propertius V. (IV.) 2. The god, whose name seems to be good Latin, was in charge of turning or exchange, and received a temple in Rome after the overthrow of his home town of Volsinii in 264 B.C. The Basilica Sempronia was later supplanted by the Basilica Julia.