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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 1 (search)
elieved, just as if I myself had sharedB.C. 201 the labour and the peril, that I have come to the end of the Punic War. For while it is not at all fitting that one who has ventured to promise to write the whole history of Rome should grow wearied in dealing with the single portions of so great a task, nevertheless, when I reflect that sixty-three years —the space between the outbreak of the First and the end of the Second Punic WarThe dates of the events referred to are, respectively, 267 B.C. and 204 B.C., by Livy's reckoning, or, according to the usual chronology (which is retained in the marginal dates), 264 B.C. and 201 B.C. —have filled as many booksBooks I-XV contained the narrative of the earlier period; Books XVI-XXX covered the First and Second Punic Wars. for me as were required for the four hundred and eighty-seven years from the founding of the city to the consulship of Appius Claudius (who began the first war with the Carthaginians), already I see in my m
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PALES, TEMPLUM (search)
PALES, TEMPLUM a temple built by M. Atilius Regulus after his victory over the Sallentini in 267 B.C. (Flor. Ep. i. 15 (20): in hoc certamine victoriae pretium templum sibi pastoria Pales ultro poposcit; schol. Veron. et Bern. ad Verg. Georg. iii. i ; EE i. 231). It probably stood on the Palatine, and seems to have disappeared at an early date (cf. Tibull. ii. 5. 28). The newly discovered pre-Caesarian calendar from Antium has, under the 7th July, Palibus ii. This has been held to prove that the Parilia, celebrated on 21st April, the day of the foundation of Rome, should be derived from parere (Parilia dicuntur non Palilia, non a Pale dea, sed quod eo tempore omnia sata arboresque et herbae parturiant pariantque, Mar. Vict. GI.L. vi. 25. 23), rather than (under the form Palilia) from Pales (Varro, LL vi. 15: Palilia dicta a Pale, quod ei Feriae). See Mancini in NS 1921, 101. Cf. also Mitt. 1921, 28-33. The dual form may be accounted for by the fact that Pales appears sometimes a
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
Victory on Palatine dedicated, 570. of Juppiter Stator vowed, 303. 293of Fors Fortuna, 212. of Quirinus dedicated, 438. Colossal statue of Juppiter set up on Capitol, 49. 291Via Appia probably prolonged to Venusia, 559. Return of embassy from Epidaurus and foundation of Temple of Aesculapius, 2, 282. 287Assembly meets in Aesculetum, 3. 281Via Appia prolonged to Tarentum, 559. 272Temple of Consus on Aventine, 141. Anio Vetus begun, 12. 268Temple of Tellus vowed, 511. 267of Pales, 38x. 264of Vortumnus, 584. Via Appia prolonged to Brundusium, 559. 260(after). Columnae of Duilius, 134. Temple of Janus in Foro Holitorio, 277. 259of Tempestates, 511. 255Columna rostrata of M. Aemilius Paullus, 134. 254 or 250Temple of Fides on Capitol, 209. 241Temple of Vesta burnt, 557. Statue of Janus brought from Falerii, 280. Temple of Minerva Capta (?), 344. 241-220Institution of the Argei, 51. 240 (238)Temple of Flora, 209. 238Clivus Publicius built and paved
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Libo, L. Ju'lius was consul B. C. 267, with M. Atilius Regulus, three years before the first Punic war. The two consuls made war upon the Sallentini in Apulia, whom they conquered, and celebrated their victory by a triumph. (Eutrop. 2.17; Fasti Triumph.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Re'gulus, Ati'lius 3. M. Atilius Regulus, M. F. L. N., was consul for the first time in B. C. 267, with L. Julius Libo, conquered the Sallentini, took the town of Brundusium, and obtained in consequence the honour of a triumph. (Eutrop. 2.17; Flor. 1.20 ; Zonar. 8.7; comp. Liv. Epit. 15.) Eleven years afterwards, B. C. 256, he was consul a second time with L. Manlius Vulso Longus, and was elected in the place of Q. Caedicius, who had died soon after he came into office. This was the ninth year of the first Punic war. The Romans had resolved to make a strenuous effort to bring the contest to a conclusion, and had accordingly determined to invade Africa with a great force. The two consuls set sail with 330 ships, took the legions on board in Sicily, and then put out to sea from Ecnomus in order to cross over to Africa. The Carthaginian fleet, however, was waiting for them under the command of Hamilcar and Hanno at Heraclea Minoa, and immediately sailed out to meet them. In the battle w
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller), Marcus Regulus (search)
Marcus Regulus Atilius, a favourite hero of old Rome; consul (267 and 256), annihilated the Carthaginian fleet, took many towns, was finally (255) defeated and taken prisoner, 1.39; 3.99. his famous embassy and the ethics of his conduct, 3.99–115