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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 267 BC or search for 267 BC in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Libo, L. Ju'lius was consul B. C. 267, with M. Atilius Regulus, three years before the first Punic war. The two consuls made war upon the Sallentini in Apulia, whom they conquered, and celebrated their victory by a triumph. (Eutrop. 2.17; Fasti Triumph.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Re'gulus, Ati'lius 3. M. Atilius Regulus, M. F. L. N., was consul for the first time in B. C. 267, with L. Julius Libo, conquered the Sallentini, took the town of Brundusium, and obtained in consequence the honour of a triumph. (Eutrop. 2.17; Flor. 1.20 ; Zonar. 8.7; comp. Liv. Epit. 15.) Eleven years afterwards, B. C. 256, he was consul a second time with L. Manlius Vulso Longus, and was elected in the place of Q. Caedicius, who had died soon after he came into office. This was the ninth year of the first Punic war. The Romans had resolved to make a strenuous effort to bring the contest to a conclusion, and had accordingly determined to invade Africa with a great force. The two consuls set sail with 330 ships, took the legions on board in Sicily, and then put out to sea from Ecnomus in order to cross over to Africa. The Carthaginian fleet, however, was waiting for them under the command of Hamilcar and Hanno at Heraclea Minoa, and immediately sailed out to meet them. In the battle w