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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 5 5 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 271 BC or search for 271 BC in all documents.

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Ara'tus (*)/Aratos), of Sicyon, lived from B. C. 271 to 213. The life of this remarkable man, as afterwards of Philopoemen and Lycortas, was devoted to an attempt to unite the several Grecian states together, and by this union to assert the national independence against the dangers with which it was threatened by Macedonia and Rome. Aratus was the son of Cleinias, and was born at Sicyon, B. C. 271. On the murder of his father by Abantidas [ABANTIDAS], Aratus was saved from the general extirpB. C. 271. On the murder of his father by Abantidas [ABANTIDAS], Aratus was saved from the general extirpation of the family by Soso, his uncle's widow, who conveyed him to Argos, where he was brought up. When he had reached the age of twenty, he gained possession of his native city by the help of some Argians, and the cooperation of the remainder of his party in Sicyon itself, without loss of life, and deprived the usurper Nicocles of his power, B. C. 251. (Comp. Plb. 2.43.) Through the influence of Aratus, Sicyon now joined the Achaean league, and Aratus himself sailed to Egypt to obtain Ptole
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Claudus, C. Quinctius patrician, consul with L. Genucius Clepsina in B. C. 271. (Fasti.
Clepsina 2. L. Genucius Clepsina, probably brother of the preceding, was consul in B. C. 271 with C. Quinctius Claudus. He was sent to subdue the Campanian legion, which under Decius Jubellius had revolted from the Romans and made itself master of Rhegium. After a long siege, Clepsina took the town; he straightway put to death all the loose vagabonds and robbers whom he found among the soldiers, but sent the remains of the legion (probably a few above 300, though the numbers vary in the different authorities) to Rome for trial, where they were scourged and beheaded. (Oros. 4.3; Dionys. A. R. 20.7 in Mai's Excerpta; Appian, Samn. 9; Polyb. 1.7; Liv. Epit. 15; Zonar. 8.6; V. Max. 2.7.15; Frontin. Strateg. 4.1.38.) Orosius and Dionysius are the only writers who mention the name of the consul, with the exception of Appian, who calls him by mistake Fabricius; and even the two former do not entirely agree. Orosius calls the consul Genucius simply, and places the capture of Rhegium in the y
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ssana. This physician was himself a natire of Rhegium, a fact which few persons knew, and he now took the opportunity to avenge on Decius the wrongs he had inflicted upon Rhegium. He gave him something which he was to apply to his eyes, and which, however painful it might be, he was to continue till the physician should return from Messana. The order was obeyed, but the pain became at last quite unbearable, and Decius in the end found that he was quite blind. After the death of Pyrrhus, in B. C. 271, Fabricius was sent out against Rhegium; he be sieged the place, and took it. All the survivors of the Campanian legion that fell into his hands, upreceive wards of three hundred men, were sent to Rome, where they were scourged and beheaded in the forum. The citizens of Rhegium who were yet alive were restored to their native place. Decius put an end to himself in his prison at Rome. (Appian, Samnit. Excerpt. 9.1-3; Diodor. Fragm. lib. xxii.; Liv. Epit. 12, 15; Plb. 1.7; V. Max. 7.7.15.) [