hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 3 3 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone 2 2 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Boethius, Consolatio Philosophiae 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long). You can also browse the collection for 280 BC or search for 280 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
progress is an approach towards this point. How then do we admit that virtue is such as I have said, and yet seek progress in other things and make a display of it? What is the product of virtue? Tranquillity. Who then makes improvement? Is it he who has read many books of Chrysippus?Diogenes Laertius (Chrysippus, lib. vii.) states that Chrysippus wrote seven hundred and five books, or treatises, or whatever the word suggra/mmata means. He was born at Soli, in Cilicia, or at Tarsus, in B. C. 280, as it is reckoned, and on going to Athens he became a pupil of the Stoic Cleanthes. But does virtue consist in having understood Chrysippus? If this is so, progress is clearly nothing else than knowing a great deal of Chrysippus. But now we admit that virtue produces one thing, and we declare that approaching near to it is another thing, namely, progress or improvement. Such a person, says one, is already able to read Chrysippus by himself. Indeed, sir, you are making great progress. What ki