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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 8 8 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, INSULA TIBERINA (search)
entis Epidaurii (Sidon. Apoll. Ep. i. 7. 12); and in the Middle Ages, insula Lycaonia (HJ 632, note 21; and esp. Besnier, 76-87). It was also called simply insula (CIL vi. 9824, 33864; Fest. 110). The present length of the island is 269 metres, and its greatest width 67 metres. Tradition held that its nucleus was formed by the grain from the fields of the Tarquins, which was thrown into the Tiber in great quantities after the expulsion of the kings (Liv. ii. 5; Dionys. v. 13; see GAIA). In 292 B.C. the serpent of Aesculapius, which, with the statue of that god, was being brought to Rome, left the ship and swam ashore on the island. A temple was erected to the god and the island was consecrated as its temenos, although shrines to other divinities (e.g. IUPITER, FAUNUS, TIBERINUS, SEMO SANCUS, q.v.) were afterwards built on it. For a terra-cotta acroterion which probably came from an archaic temple on the island-it is too early in style to be attributable to that of Aesculapius-see HF 1