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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 22 22 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 8-10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for 310 BC or search for 310 BC in all documents.

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Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VI., CHAPTER IV. (search)
red the same contrary to all expectation.See Poly b. Hist. book i. chap. vi. § 1, edit. Schweigh, tom. i. p. 12. This took place, according to Polybius, in the nineteenth year after the naval engagement of Ægos-potami,This battle was fought in the year 405 B. C. about the time of the con- clusion of the peace of Antalcidas.Concluded 387 B. C. Having escaped these misfortunes, the Romans first reduced all the LatinsAbout 338 B. C. to complete obedience, they then subdued the Tyrrheni,About 310 B. C. and stayed the Kelts, who border the Po, from their too frequent and licentious forays; then the Samnites, and after them they conquered the Tarentines and Pyrrhus,About 275 B. C. and presently after the remainder of what is now considered as Italy, with the exception of the districts on the Po. While these still remained a subject of dispute they passed over into Sicily,In the year 264 B. C. and having wrested that island from the CarthaginiansIn the year 241 B. C. they re-
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK XVII., CHAPTER III. (search)
g parallel to it, first by the Maurusii, but deep in the interior of the country by the largest of the African tribes, called Gætuli. Historians, beginning with the voyage of Ophelas (Apellas ?),Tyrwhitt reads Apellas, for Ophellas of the text. Apellas was a Cyrenæan navigator, whose Periplus is mentioned by Marcianus of Heracleia. There was an Ophellas of Cyrene, who advanced at the head of an army along the coast, to unite himself to Agathocles, who was then besieging Carthage, B. C. 310. He was put to death by Agathocles soon after his arrival, and no Periplus of his said to have existed; his course also to Carthage was by land. have invented a great number of fables respecting the sea-coast of Africa beyond the Pillars. We have mentioned them before, and mention them now, requesting our readers to pardon the introduction of marvellous stories, whenever we may be compelled to relate anything of the kind, being unwilling to pass them over entirely in silence, and