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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 31 31 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 312 BC or search for 312 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AQUA APPIA (search)
AQUA APPIA * the first Roman aqueduct, constructed in 312 B.C. by Appius Claudius Caecus Eutrop. ii. 9:eo tempore Appius Claudius censor aquam Claudiam (sic) induxit et viam Appiam stravit. and C. Plautius, who acquired the cognomen Venox for having found the springs (Liv. ix. 29. 6; Plin.NH xxxvi. 21 ; Frontinus, de aquis i. 4-7, 9, 18, 22; ii. 65, 79, 125; Not. app.; Pol. Silv. 545; CIL xi. 1827 =i 2. p. 192, No. X). The intake is described by Frontinus as being in agro Lucullano, 780 paces to the left of the via Praenestina, So Frontinus; Lanciani emends to Collatina. between the seventh and eighth miles but the springs have never been satisfactorily identified. The supply was 1825 quinariae, or 75,737 cubic metres in 24 hours. The channel was almost entirely subterranean, 11,190 paces in length, to the SALINAE (q.v.) of which only 60 paces near the porta Capena were carried on substructions and on arches. Near SPES VETUS (q.v.) it was joined ad Gemellos by a branch named Aug
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
, 3. 389(after). Via Latina, 564. 388Area Capitolina enlarged, 48. Temple of Mars on Via Appia, 328. 384Patrians forbidden to dwell on Arx or Capitol, 54, 97. 378Fortifications of Palatine, 376. 377-353The 'Servian ' walls rebuilt, 353. 375Temple of Juno Lucina, 288. 367of Concord vowed, 138. 344Camills builds Temple of Juno Moneta, 54, 289. 338Columna Maenia, 131. (after). The Rostra decorated with prows, 450. 329First carceres in Circus Maximus, 114. 325Templ of uirins vowed, 438. 312Aqua Appia and Via Appia constructed, 2a, 559. 311Temple of Salus vowed, 462. 310Gilded shields used to decorate Tabernae in Forum, 504. 306Temple of Salus begun, 462. Equus Tremuli, 202. 305Colossal statue of Hercules placed on Capitol, 49. 304Shrine of Concord on Graecostasis, 138, 248. 303Temple of Salus dedicated, 462. IIIrd cent.Lower room of Carcer (?) 100. 296Clivus Martis paved, 123. Quadriga of Capitoline Temple replaced, 298. Sacellum Pudicitiae Plebeiae, 434. Monume