hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 20 20 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 8-10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 314 BC or search for 314 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 20 document sections:

1 2
Acro'tatus (*)Akro/tatos). 1. The son of Cleomenes II. king of Sparta, incurred the displeasure of a large party at Sparta by opposing the decree, which was to release from infamy all who had fled from the battle, in which Antipater defeated Agis, B. C. 331. He was thus glad to accept the offer of the Agrigentines, when they sent to Sparta for assistance in B. C. 314 against Agathocles of Syracuse. He first sailed to Italy, and obtained assistance from Tarentum; but on his arrival at Agrigentum he acted with such cruelty and tyranny that the inhabitants rose against him, and compelled him to leave the city. He returned to Sparta, and died before the death of his father, which was in B. C. 309. He left a son, Areus, who succeeded Cleomenes. (Diod. 15.70, 71; Paus. 1.13.3, 3.6.1, 2; Plut. Agis 3
he Attic orators, and the effeminate luxuriance of the so-called Asiatic school of oratory. On one occasion he read to his audience in Rhodes his speech against Ctesiphon, and when some of his hearers expressed their astonishment at his having been defeated notwithstanding his brilliant oration, he replied, " You would cease to be astonished, if you had heard Demosthenes." (Cic. De Orat. 3.56; Plin. Nat. 7.30; Plin. Ep. 2.3; Quinctil. 11.3.6.) From Rhodes he went to Samos, where he died in B. C. 314. The conduct of Aeschines has been censured by the writers of all ages; and for this many reasons may be mentioned. In the first place, and above all, it was his misfortune to be constantly placed in juxtaposition or opposition to the spotless glory of Demosthenes, and this must have made him appear more guilty in the eyes of those who saw through his actions, while in later times the contrast between the greatest orators of the time was frequently made the theme of rhetorical declamatio
r returned to Greece with a present of 500 talents from Antigonus, and a multitude of magnificent promises. (Diod. 19.60, 61.) Yet, in the very same year, we find him renouncing his alliance with Antigonus, and bribed by the title of governor of the Peloponnesus to reconcile himself to Cassander. (Diod. 19.64.) In the ensuing year, 314, we read of him as engaged for Cassander in the siege of Cyllene, which however was raised by Aristodemus and his Aetolian auxiliaries. After the return of Aristodemus to Aetolia, the citizens of Dyme, in Achaia, having besieged the citadel, which was occupied by one of Cassander's garrisons, Alexander forced his way into the city, and made himself master of it, punishing the adverse party with death, imprisonment, or exile. (Diod. 19.66.) Very son after this he was murdered at Sicyon by Alexion, a Sicyonian, leaving the command of his forces to one who proved herself fully adequate to the task, --his wife Cratesipolis. (B. C. 314, Diod. 19.67.) [E.E]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Androni'cus of OLYNTHUS (search)
Androni'cus of OLYNTHUS (*)Andro/nikos), of OLYNTHUS, who is probably the same as the son of Agerrhus mentioned by Arrian (Arr. Anab. 3.23), was one of the four generals appointed by Antigonus to form the military council of the young Demetrius, in B. C. 314. He commanded the right wing of Demetrius' army at the battle of Gaza in 312, and after the loss of the battle, and the subsequent retreat of Demetrius, was left in command of Tyre. He refused to surrender the city to Ptolemy, who, however, obtained possession of it, but spared the life of Andronicus, who fell into his hands. (Diod. 19.69, 86
made governor of the peninsula. Ptolemy, who was allied with Cassander, sent a fleet against the general and the allies of Antigonus, and Cassander made considerable conquests in Peloponnesus. After his departure, Aristodemus and Alexander at first endeavoured in common to persuade the towns to expel the garrisons of Cassander, and recover their independence. But Alexander soon allowed himself to be made a traitor to the cause he had hitherto espoused, and was rewarded by Cassander with the chief command of his forces in the Peloponnesus. In B. C. 314, Aristodemus invited the Aetolians to support the cause of Antigonus; and having raised a great number of mercenaries among them, he attacked Alexander, who was besieging Cyllene, and compelled him to raise the siege. lHe then restored several other places, such as Patrae in Achaia and Dymae in Aetolia, to what was then called freedom. After this, B. C. 306, Aristodemus occurs once more in history. (Diod. 19.57-66; Plut. Demetr. 16, 17.)
ction with some other Campanians, the Calavii are said to have set fire to various parts of Rome, B. C. 211, in order to avenge themselves for what the Campanians had suffered from the Romans. A slave of the Calavii betrayed the crime, and the whole family, together with their slaves who had been accomplices in the crime, were arrested and punished. (Liv. 26.27.) Cala'vius 1, 2. Novius Calavius and OVIUS CALAVIUS are mentioned as the leaders of the conspiracy which broke out at Capua in B. C. 314. C. Maenius was appointed dictator to coerce the insurgents, and the two Calavii, dreading the consequences of their conspiracy, are believed to have made away with themselves. (Liv. 9.26.) Cala'vius 3. Ofilius Calavius, son of Ovius Calavius, was a man of great distinction at Capua, and when in B. C. 321 the Campanians exulted over the defeat of the Romans at Caudium, and believed that their spirit was broken, Ofilius Calavius taught his fellow-citizens to look at the matter in another
Cala'vius 1, 2. Novius Calavius and OVIUS CALAVIUS are mentioned as the leaders of the conspiracy which broke out at Capua in B. C. 314. C. Maenius was appointed dictator to coerce the insurgents, and the two Calavii, dreading the consequences of their conspiracy, are believed to have made away with themselves. (Liv. 9.26.)
Cratesi'polis (*Krathsi/polis), wife of Alexander, the son of Polysperchon, was highly distinguished for her beauty, talents, and energy. On the murder of her husband at Sicyon, in B. C. 314 [see p. 126a], she kept together his forces, with whom her kindness to the men had made her extremely popular, and when the Sicyonians, hoping for an easy conquest over a woman, rose against the garrison for the purpose of establishing an independent government, she quelled the sedition, and, leaving crucified thirty of the popular leaders, held the town firmly in subjection for Cassander. [See p. 620.] In B. C. 308, however, she was induced by Ptolemy Lagi to betray Corinth and Sicyon to him, these being the only places, except Athens, yet possessed by Cassander in Greece. Cratesipolis was at Corinth at the time, and, as her troops would not have consented to the surrender, she introduced a body of Ptolemy's forces into the town, pretending that they were a reinforcement which she had sent for f
aughtily rejected by Papirius, who now made a successful attack upon the camp of the Samnites: they were compelled to retreat and to leave Luceria to its fate. Seven thousand Samnites at Luceria are said to have capitulated for a free departure, without their arms and baggage; and the Frentanians, who attempted to revolt against the Romans, were obliged to submit as subjects and give hostages. After these things were accomplished, he returned to Rome and celebrated his second triumph. In B. C. 314 Papirius obtained the consulship for the fourth (or fifth) time. Although the war against the Samnites was still going on, neither Papirius nor his colleague Publilius Philo is mentioned by Livy as having taken part in the campains of that year, which were conducted by dictators, while the consuls are said to have remained at home. It is difficult to account for this state of things. In B. C. 313 Papirius was invested with his fifth (or sixth) consulship. The war against the Samnites wa
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Flaccina'tor, M. Fo'slius 2. Master of the equites to the dictator C. Maenius, for the first time in B. C. 320, according to the Fasti, but according to Livy in B. C. 312 (9.26). Both the dictator and Flaccinator resigned on being accused of illegal association against the republic; and both were tried before the consuls and honorably acquitted. Flaccinator was consul in B. C. 318 (Liv. 9.20), and master of the equites, according to the Fasti, a second time to C. Maenius B. C. 314, but according to Livy (9.28) to the dictator C. Poetelius. The cause and circumstances of his trial will be better understood by referring to MAENIUS. [W.B.D]
1 2