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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 17 17 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 3-4 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 4 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.), chapter 20 (search)
e founder or renewer of all the temples, that he had entered the shrine of Jupiter Feretrius, which he repaired when it had crumbled with age, and had himself read the inscription on the linen breast-plate, I have thought it would be almost sacrilege to rob Cossus of such a witness to his spoils as Caesar, the restorer of that very temple.Nepos tells us (Att. xx. 3) that the restoration of this temple was undertaken at the suggestion of Atticus. It was therefore probably done not later than 32 B.C., the year in which Atticus died. Where the error in regard to this matter lies, in consequence of which such ancient annals and also the books of the magistrates, written on linen and deposited in the temple of Moneta, which Licinius Macer cites from time to time as his authority, only give Aulus Cornelius Cossus as consul (with Titus Quinctius Poenus) seven years later, is a matter on which everybody is entitled to his opinion. For there is this further reason why so famous a bat
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, APOLLO, AEDES (search)
xxvii. 37. 11). These indications point definitely to a site just north of the theatre of Marcellus and east of the porticus Octaviae, on the street that led through the porta Carmentalis to the campus Martius, a little south of the present Piazza Campitelli. 32 B.C. and governor of Syria (Prosop. iii. 253. 556; but cf. JRS 1916, 183). Livy's statement (vii. 20. 9: relicum anni (353 B.C.) muris turribusque reficiendis consumptum et aedes Apollinis dedicata est) may refer to an earlier restoration, as the direct evidence of Asconius precludes the possibility of any second temple. This temple was also known as that of Apollo Medicus, and in 179 B.C. the censors let the contract for building a porticus from it to the Tiber, behind the temple of Spes (Liv.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, GENIUS POPULI ROMANI (search)
GENIUS POPULI ROMANI (aedicula ? new/s, nao/s, you= *geni/ou tou= dh/mou Cass. Dio) : (1)a shrine dedicated to the Genius of the Roman people, near the temple of Concord in the forum, mentioned twice in connection with prodigies in the years 43 and 32 B.C. (Cass. Dio xlvii. 2. 3; 1. 8. 2), and on an inscription (CIL vi. 248) found between the clivus Capitolinus and the basilica Iulia. Aurelian ' genium populi Romani aureum in rostris posuit ' (Chron. 148 ; cf. Becker, Top. 320), which probably means that the shrine was close to the rostra, and this agrees with the order in Not. (Reg. VIII; see Jord. i. 2. 377; DE iii. 467-468; RE vii. I 66). (2) According to the calendars (Fast. Amit. Arval. ad vii Id. Oct., CIL i². p. 245,214, 331) sacrifices were offered on 9th October to the Genius populi Romani, Felicitas and Venus Victrix in Capitolio, and therefore there was probably a shrine or altar of this Genius on the Capitol also. Whether it was dedicated to the Genius alone, or to th
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THEATRUM POMPEI (search)
n, the inscription on the temple, or on the temple and scaena both, was evidently put in place in 52 B.C. From the notice in two calendars (Fast. Allif. Amit. ad pr. Id. Aug., CIL i². p. 217, 244, 324; cf. Suet. Claud. 2 : cum prius apud superiores aedes supplicasset) it appears that there were shrines or altars to three other deities, Honor Virtus and Felicitas, similarly placed in the theatre, and perhaps a fourth (Fast. Allif.: V. ... ?). Augustus restored the theatre at great expense in 32 B.C. (Mon. Anc. iv. 9: sine ulla inscriptione nominis mei; cf., however, CIL vi. 9404: in schola sub theatro Aug(usto) Pompeian(o) ), and removed the statue of Pompeius, before which Caesar had been murdered, from the CURIA POMPEI (q.v.) to the theatre itself (Suet. Aug. 31: Pompei quoque statuam contra theatri eius regiam (the middle door of the scaena, Jord. FUR p. 23) marmoreo iano superposuit). Cf. also CIL vi. 32323. 157 (acta lud. saec. Aug.). It was burned in 21 A.D. (Hier. a. Abr. 2037)
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
a Publica restored, 581. Basilica Aemilia dedicated after restoration, 72. 33Agrippa: restores Cloaca Maxima, 126: repairs aqueducts, 13, 23, 24, 27; places seven dolphins on spina of Circus Maximus, 115. Porticus Octavia restored, 426. 32Theatre of Pompey restored, 516. 32(ca.). Sosius restores Temple of Apollo, 15. 31Temple of Spes burnt and restored (Temple in Forum Holitorium ?), 278. of Ceres, Liber and Libera burnt, 110: Circus Maximus damaged by fire, 115. (ca.). Augu32(ca.). Sosius restores Temple of Apollo, 15. 31Temple of Spes burnt and restored (Temple in Forum Holitorium ?), 278. of Ceres, Liber and Libera burnt, 110: Circus Maximus damaged by fire, 115. (ca.). Augustus restores Temple of Jupiter Feretrius, 293. 29-14 A.D.Augustus: he extends Pomerium, 393; reclaims Campus Esquilinus, 91: enlarges the Rostra, 452; Temple of Diana rebuilt, 150; restores Temple of Flora, 209: of Juno Regina, 290: of the Lares, 314: of Minerva on the Aventine, 342: of the Penates, 388; paves Clivus Palatinus, 124: Forum, 234: Clivus Capitolinus, 122; erects Arch of Octavius, 42; builds pulvinar in Circus Maximus, 115: P
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Cicero's Family and Friends. (search)
Cicero, and others, Nep. Att. 15. made loans to individuals and towns, Nep. Att. 8; Cic. All. 1.13.1; 16.16a.4, 5. carried on the business of a publisher, Att. 2.1.2; 12.40.1; 12.45.3. and even kept trained bands of gladiators. Att. 4.4b.2; 4.8a.2. He abstained carefully from all participation in politics, and yet was on intimate terms with members of all political parties. His philosophical views were in harmony with his political attitude, as he was an Epicurean. His sister Pomponia married Q. Cicero. The intimate friendship which existed between Atticus and Cicero had a practical as well as a sentimental basis. Atticus found it profitable to act as Cicero's financial agent, and he found the letters of recommendation, which his friend wrote for him to the governors of provinces, of great service, while Cicero derived great profit from the advice and help which Atticus rendered him in domestic, political, literary, and financial matters. Atticus died in 32 B.C. Nep. Att. 22.
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Cicero's Correspondence and its First Publication. (search)
hat such a collection of Cicero's letters, not yet published, was in the possession of Atticus, makes it almost certain that these letters were arranged for publication by him. It is probable that they were not published until after his death (32 B.C.).Bücheler (Rhein. Mus. 1879, p. 352) believes that they were published between 60 and 65 A.D., but his argument is not convincing. Some of the men of note upon whom Cicero had expressed unfavorable opinions were still living in 32 B.C., and the32 B.C., and the publication of these letters would therefore have been indiscreet. The books in the collection ad Att. stand in chronological order, and the letters within the books are arranged chronologically, but not with accuracy. With the Epistulae ad Quintum fratrem may be mentioned the Commentariolum Petitionis,Upon the authenticity of the Commentariolum Petitionis, cf. Tyrrell, vol.1.2 pp. 110-121; Hendrickson, Amer. Jour. of Philol. vol. XIII. no.2. a document which Quintus sent to his brother when
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
His various works were adorned with statues by the first artists of Rome. These splendid buildings he augmented in B. C. 27, during his third consulship, by several others, and among these was the Pantheon, on which we still read the inscription: " M. Agrippa: L. F. Cos. Tertium fecit." (D. C. 49.43, 53.27; Plin. Nat. 36.15, s. 24 § 3; Strab. v. p.235; Frontin. De Aquaed. 9.) When the war broke out between Octavianus and M. Antonius, Agrippa was appointed comnander-in-chief of the fleet, B. C. 32. He took Methone in the Peloponnesus, Leucas, Patrae, and Corinth; and in the battle of Actium (B. C. 31) where he commanded, the victory was mainly owing to his skill. On his return to Rome in B. C. 30, Octavianus, now Augustus, rewarded him with a " vexillum caeruleum," or sea-green flag. In B. C. 28, Agrippa became consul for the second time with Augustus, and about this time married Marcella, the niece of Augustus, and the daughter of his sister Octavia. His former wife, Pomponia, the
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Herodes Atticus or Atticus Herodes (search)
. Atticus did not return to Rome till B. C. 65, when political affairs had become more settled; and the day of his departure was one of general mourning among the Athenians, whom he had assisted with loans of money, and benefited in various ways. During his residence at Athens, he purchased an estate at Buthrotum in Epeirus, in which place, as well as at Athens and afterwards at Rome, he spent the greater part of his time, engaged in literary pursuits and commercial undertakings. He died in B. C. 32, at the age of 77, of voluntary starvation, when he found that he was attacked by an incurable illness. His wife Pilia, to whom he was married on the 12th of February, B. C. 56, when he was fifty-three years of age, bore him only one child, a daughter, Pomponia or Caecilia, whom Cicero sometimes calls Attica and Atticula. (Ad Att. 6.5, 12.1, 13.5, &c.) Through the influence of Antony, Pomponia was married in the life-time of her father, probably in B. C. 36, to M. Vipsanius Agrippa, the mi
nt proceedings of Antony in the East were sufficient of themselves to point him out to the Romans as an enemy of the republic, but Augustus did not neglect to direct attention secretly to his follies. Letters now passed between the two triumvirs full of mutual criminations ; and Antony already purchased from Artavasdes cavalry for the impending war against his colleague. The rupture between the two triumvirs was mainly brought about by the jealousy and ambition of Cleopatra. During the year B. C. 32, while Cleopatra kept Antony in a perpetual state of intoxication, Augustus had time to convince the Romans that the heavy sacrifices he demanded of them were to be made on their own behalf only, as Italy had to fear everything from Antony War was now declared against Cleopatra, for Antony was looked upon'only as her infatuated slave. In B. C. 31, Augustus was consul for the third time with M. Valerius Messalla. Rome was in a state of great excitement and alarm, and all classes had to make
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