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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 24 24 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 325 BC or search for 325 BC in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
rtificial obstructions which had been made in the river for the purpose of irrigation. The Macedonians, who were discontented with several of the new arrangements of the king, and especially at his placing the Persians on an equality with themselves in many respects, rose in mutinyagainst him, which he quelled with some little difficulty, and he afterwards dismissed about 10,000 Macedonian veterans, who returned to Europe under the command of Craterus. Towards the close of the same year (B. C. 325) he went to Ecbatana, where he lost his great favourite Hephaestion; and his grief for his loss knew no bounds. From Ecbatana he marched to Babylon, subduing in his way the Cossaei, a mountain tribe; and before he reached Babylon, he was met by ambassadors from almost every part of the known world, who had come to do homage to the new conqueror of Asia. Alexander reached Babylon in the spring of B. C. 324, about a year before his death, notwithstanding the warnings of the Chaldeans, who
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Anti'ochus Soter (search)
Anti'ochus I. or Anti'ochus Soter (*)Anti/oxos), king of SYRIA, surnamed SOTER (*Swth/r), was the son of Seleucus Nicator and a Persian lady, Apama. The marriage of his father with Apama was one of those marriages which Alexander celebrated at Susa in B. C. 325, when he gave Persian wives to his generals. This would fix the birth of Antiochus about B. C. 324. He was present with his father at the battle of Ipsus in B. C. 301, which secured for Seleucus the government of Asia. It is related of Antiochus, that he fell sick through love of Stratonice, the young wife of his father, and the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes, and that when his father learnt the cause of his illness through his physician Erasistratus, he resigned Stratonice to him, and gave him the government of Upper Asia with the title of king. On the murder of his father in Macedonia in B. C. 280, Antiochus succeeded to the whole of his dominions, and prosecuted his claims to the throne of Macedonia against Antigonus Gon
A'pama (*)Apa/ma or *)Apa/mh). 1. The wife of Seleucus Nicator and the mother of Antiochus Soter, was married to Seleucus in B. C. 325, when Alexander gave to his generals Asiatic wives. According to Arrian (7.4), she was the daughter of Spitamenes, the Bactrian, but Strabo (xii. p.578) calls her, erroneously, the daughter of Artabazus. (Comp. Appian. Syr. 57; and Liv. 38.13, who also makes a mistake in calling her the sister, instead of the wife, of Seleucus; Steph. Byz. s. v. *)Apa/meia
Baryaxes (*Barua/chs), a Mede, who assumed the sovereignty during Alexander's absence in India, but was seized by Atropates, the satrap of Media, and put to death by Alexander, B. C. 325. (Arrian, Arr. Anab. 6.29
Camillus 4. L. Furius Sp. F. M. N. CAMILLUS, son of No. 2, consul in B. C. 338, together with C. Maenius. He fought in this year successfully against the Tiburtines, and took their town Tibur. The two consuls united completed the subjugation of Latium; they were rewarded with a triumph, and equestrian statues, then a rare distinction, were erected to them in the forum. Camillus further distinguished himself by advising his countrymen to treat the Latins with mildness. In B. C. 325 he was elected consul a second time, together with D. Junius Brutus Scaeva. In this year war was declared against the Vestinians, and Camillus obtained Samnium for his province; but while he was engaged in the war, he was attacked by a severe illness, and was ordered to nominate L. Papirius Cursor dictator to continue the war. (Liv. 8.13, 16, &c., 29; Plin. Nat. 33.5.)
Cleander 4. One of Alexander's officers, son of Polemocrates. Towards the winter of B. C. 334, Alexauder, being then in Caria, sent him to the Peloponnesus to collect mercenaries, and with these he returned and joined the king while he was engaged in the siege of Tyre, B. C. 331. (Arr. Anab. 1.24, 2.20; Curt. 3.1.1, 4.3.11.) In B. C. 330 he was employed by Polydamas, Alexander's emissary, to kill Parmenion, under whom he had been left as second in command at Ecbatana. (Arr. Anab. 3.26; Curt. 7.2. §§ 19, 27-32 ; Plut. Alex. 49; Diod. 17.80; Just. 12.5.) On Alexander's arrival in Carmania, B. C. 325, Cleander joined him there, together with some other generals from Media and their forces. But he was accused with the rest of extreme profligacy and oppression, not unmixed with sacrilege, in his command, and was put to death by order of Alexander. (Arr. Anab. 6.27; Diod. 17.106; Plut. Alex. 68; Curt. 10.1. §§ 1-8; Just. 12.
Comi'nius 2. L. Cominius, military tribune in the army of the dictator, L. Papirius Cursor, B. C. 325. (Liv. 8.30.)
Dei'nias (*Deini/as). 1. One of a club of wits at Athens (gelwtopoioi/), called " the Sixty," of which the orator Callimedon also was a member. The date therefore may be placed about B. C. 325. (Athen. 14.614e.) He is perhaps the same whom Demosthenes mentions as a skilful orator. (c. Lept. p. 501
losopher, and a poet. His surname Phalereus is given him from his birthplace, the Attic demos of Phalerus, where he was born about Ol. 108 or 109, B. C. 345. He was the son of Phanostratus, a man without rank or property (D. L. 5.75; Aelian, Ael. VH 12.43); but notwithstanding this, he rose to the highest honours at Athens through his great natural powers and his perseverance. He was educated, together with the poet Menander, in the school of Theophrastus. He began his public career about B. C. 325, at the time of the disputes respecting Harpalus, and soon acquired a great reputation by the talent he displayed in public speaking. He belonged to the party of Phocion; and as he acted completely in the spirit of that statesman, Cassander, after the death of Phocion in B. C. 317, placed Demetrius at the head of the administration of Athens. He filled this office for ten years in such a manner, that the Athenians in their gratitude conferred upon him the most extraordinary distinctions, a
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Deme'trius PHALEREUS or Deme'trius of Phaleron (search)
losopher, and a poet. His surname Phalereus is given him from his birthplace, the Attic demos of Phalerus, where he was born about Ol. 108 or 109, B. C. 345. He was the son of Phanostratus, a man without rank or property (D. L. 5.75; Aelian, Ael. VH 12.43); but notwithstanding this, he rose to the highest honours at Athens through his great natural powers and his perseverance. He was educated, together with the poet Menander, in the school of Theophrastus. He began his public career about B. C. 325, at the time of the disputes respecting Harpalus, and soon acquired a great reputation by the talent he displayed in public speaking. He belonged to the party of Phocion; and as he acted completely in the spirit of that statesman, Cassander, after the death of Phocion in B. C. 317, placed Demetrius at the head of the administration of Athens. He filled this office for ten years in such a manner, that the Athenians in their gratitude conferred upon him the most extraordinary distinctions, a
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