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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 46 46 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 4 4 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 1 1 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 330 BC or search for 330 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, VITRUVIUS VACCUS, DOMUS (search)
VITRUVIUS VACCUS, DOMUS on the Palatine. It was destroyed in 330 B.C., when its owner, a native of Fundi, was put to death for treason. The site was afterwards known as Vacci prata (Cic. de domo 101; Liv. viii. 19. 4, 20. 8; Jord. i. I. 189).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PALATINUS MONS (search)
nd MAGNA MATER (q.v.), and only with regard to the last has any certainty been attained. The road system of the Palatine was fundamentally changed by the buildings of the imperial period; these also blotted out the remains of the private houses, which, as the Palatine changed its character and began to come into favour, owing to its position, as a place of residence for the aristocracy, sprang up all over the hill. The oldest of which we have any record is that of VITRUVIUS VACCUS (q.v.) in 330 B.C. Later we hear of that of Cn. Octavius, consul in 165 B.C., which was bought by M. SCAURUS for the enlargement of his own house (q.v.); and not far off was that of Crassus. The house of M. Fulvius Flaccus, consul in 125 B.C., on the site of which Q. Lutatius Catulus built a portico, and a house for himself close to it, must have lain near the north end of the hill; as also must that of M. Livius Drusus, as well as that of Cicero. Other important republican houses, such as those of Q. Cicero,