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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 29 29 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 7 7 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 4 4 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 3 3 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 3 3 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 2 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography. You can also browse the collection for 338 BC or search for 338 BC in all documents.

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Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 3 (search)
sequence of this they also were poorly governed. One evidence of their bad policies is the fact that they employed foreign generals; for they sent for AlexanderAlexander I was appointed king of Epeirus by Philip of Macedonia about 342 B.C., and was killed by a Luecanian about 330 B.C. (cp. 6. 1. 5). the Molossian to lead them in their war against the Messapians and Leucanians, and, still before that, for Archidamus,Archidamus III, king of Sparta, was born about 400 B.C. and lost his life in 338 B.C. in this war. the son of Agesilaüs, and, later on, for Cleonymus,Little is know of this Cleonymus, save that he was the son of Cleomenes II, who reigned at Sparta 370-309 B.C. and Agathocles,Agathocles (b. about 361 B.C.—d. 289 B.C.) was a tyrant of Syracuse. He appears to have led the Tarantini about 300 B.C. and then for Pyrrhus,Pyrrhus (about 318-272 B.C.), king of Epeirus, accepted the invitation of Tarentum in 281 B.C. at the time when they formed a league with him against the Roman
Strabo, Geography, Book 9, chapter 2 (search)
s hope; but still they went to war on behalf of the Greeks against the Phocians, who had robbed their common temple. And after suffering loss from this war, as also from the Macedonians when these attacked the Greeks,At the battle of Chaeroneia (338 B.C.). they lost their city,335 B.C. which was razed to the ground by these same people, and then received it back from them when rebuilt.By Cassander (316 B.C.). From that time on the Thebans have fared worse and worse down to our own time, and is a spring called Tilphossa, and the monument of Teiresias, who died there at the time of the flight. Chaeroneia is near Orchomenus. It was here that Philip the son of Amyntas conquered the Athenians, Boeotians, and Corinthians in a great battle,338 B.C. and set himself up as lord of Greece. And here, too, are to be seen tombs of those who fell in the battle, tombs erected at public expense. And it was in the same region that the Romans so completely defeated the forces of Mithridates, many
Strabo, Geography, Book 9, chapter 3 (search)
not the same as Hyampeia on Parnassus; also far inland is Elateia, the largest city of the Phocians, which is unknown by Homer, for it is more recent than the Homeric age, and it is advantageously situated in that it commands the passes from Thessaly. DemosthenesDem. 18.168 clearly indicates the natural advantage of its position when he speaks of the commotion that suddenly took place at Athens when a messenger came to the Prytanes with the report that Elateia had been captured.By Philip in 338 B.C. Parapotamii is a settlement on the Cephissus River near Phanoteus and Chaeroneia and Elateia. Theopompus says that this place is distant from Chaeroneia about forty stadia and marks the boundary of the territories of the Ambryseans, the Panopeans and the Daulians; and that it lies on a moderately high hill at the pass which leads from Boeotia into Phocis, between the mountains Parnassus and Hadylius, between which is left a tract of about five stadia divided by the Cephissus River, whi