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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 29 29 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 7 7 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 4 4 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 3 3 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 3 3 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 2 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for 338 BC or search for 338 BC in all documents.

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Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VI., CHAPTER III. (search)
increased to that degree that their general holidays or festivals exceeded in number the days of the year; and hence arose an inefficient government, and as one proof of their un- statesmanlike acts we may adduce their employment of foreign generals; for they sent for Alexander,About 332 or 339 B. C. See Heyn. Opusc. Acad. tom. ii. p. 141. king of the Molossi, to come and assist them against the Messapii and Leucani. They had before that employed Archidamus, the son of Agesilaus;About 338 B. C. afterwards they called in CleonymusAbout 303 B. C. and Agathocles,About 330 B. C. and later, when they rose against the Romans, Pyrrhus.About 281 B. C. They were not able even to retain the respect of those whom they had invited, but rather merited their disgust. Alexander [of Epirus] was so displeased with them that lie endeavoured to remove the seat of the general council of the Greek states in Italy, which was accustomed to assemble at Heraclea, a city of the Tarentines, to a ci
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VI., CHAPTER IV. (search)
ty suddenly, contrary to the expectation of all men, and again recovered the same contrary to all expectation.See Poly b. Hist. book i. chap. vi. § 1, edit. Schweigh, tom. i. p. 12. This took place, according to Polybius, in the nineteenth year after the naval engagement of Ægos-potami,This battle was fought in the year 405 B. C. about the time of the con- clusion of the peace of Antalcidas.Concluded 387 B. C. Having escaped these misfortunes, the Romans first reduced all the LatinsAbout 338 B. C. to complete obedience, they then subdued the Tyrrheni,About 310 B. C. and stayed the Kelts, who border the Po, from their too frequent and licentious forays; then the Samnites, and after them they conquered the Tarentines and Pyrrhus,About 275 B. C. and presently after the remainder of what is now considered as Italy, with the exception of the districts on the Po. While these still remained a subject of dispute they passed over into Sicily,In the year 264 B. C. and having wrested
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK IX., CHAPTER II. (search)
ddess abstained from every act of violence; wherefore the Thebans, at the time of the expedition of the Epigoni, abandoning their own city, are said to have taken refuge here, and on the strong mountain above it, the Tilphossium.Petra. Below Tilphossium is the fountain Tilphossa, and the monument of Teiresias, who died there on the retreat. ChæroneiaKapurna. is near Orchomenus,Scripu. where Philip, the son of Amyntas, after having overcome, in a great battle,On the 7th of August, B. C. 338. Of the details of this battle we have no account. The site of the monument is marked by a tumulus about a mile or a little more from the Khan of Kapurna, on the right side of the road towards Orchomenus. A few years ago (according to Mure) the mound of earth was excavated and a colossal lion discovered, deeply im- bedded in its interior. See Smith. the Athenians, Bœotians, and Corinthians, became the master of Greece. There are seen the sepulchres erected at the public charge of the
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK IX., CHAPTER III. (search)
ither we said the Hyintes were banished from Bœotia. It is situated quite in the interior, near Parapotamii, and is a different place from Hyampea on Parnassus. ElateiaThe ruins are situated on the east of Turkochorio, made a free state by the Romans. Pausanias, b. x. ch. 34. is the largest of the Phocian cities, but Homer was not acquainted with it, for it is later than his times. It is conveniently situated to repel incursions on the side of Thessaly. DemosthenesDemos. pro Coronâ. B. C. 338. points out the advantage of its position, in speaking of the confusion which suddenly arose, when a messenger arrived to inform the Prytaneis of the capture of Elateia. Parapotamii is a settlement on the Cephissus, in the neighbourhood of Phanoteus, Chæroneia, and Elateia. This place, according to Theopompus, is distant from Chæroneia about 40 stadia, and is the boundary between the Ambryseis, Panopeis, and Daulieis. It is situated at the entrance from Bœotia to the Phocians, upon a