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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 34 34 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham) 1 1 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Exordia (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Plato, Letters 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 353 BC or search for 353 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, APOLLO, AEDES (search)
us Octaviae, on the street that led through the porta Carmentalis to the campus Martius, a little south of the present Piazza Campitelli. 353 B.C.) muris turribusque reficiendis consumptum et aedes Apollinis dedicata est) may refer to an earlier restoration, as the direct evidence of Asconius precludes the possibility of any second temple. This temple was also known as that of Apollo Medicus, and in 179 B.C. the censors let the contract for building a porticus from it to the Tiber, behind the temple of Spes (Liv. xl. 51. 6: locavit ... porticum aliam post navalia et ad fanum Herculis et post Spei [a] Tiberi [ad] aedem Apollinis Medici
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, MURUS SERII TULLII (search)
agree with it. As the result of the Gallic invasion, the whole enceinte was enormously reinforced and strengthened, the original line, however, being for the most part, if not entirely, retained. To the construction of this wall the following passages have generally been referred: Liv. vi. 32. I: ut tribute novum fenus contraheretur in murum a censoribus locatum saxo quadrato faciundum (377 B.C.). vii. 20. 9: Legionibus Romam reductis relicum anni muris turribusque reficiendis consumptum (353 B.C.). It is natural that so great a work as this should have taken a considerable number of years to build. To this reconstruction belongs all the masonry of larger blocks. Frank remarks that, though the majority of the blocks measure 58-61 cm. high, there is a good deal of irregularity even on the outer face, where he has noted measures as low as 51 cm. and as high as 64, while on the inside, where the agger conceals the blocks, the measurements vary from 40 to 68 cm. The material, however, i