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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 18 18 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
Plato, Letters 2 2 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 2 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 5-7 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for 357 BC or search for 357 BC in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 29 (search)
s Athenians, whether they lived before him or after him. The greater number of his achievements I shall pass by, but the following facts will suffice to bear out my assertion. He put down what is known as the tyranny of the Thirty403 B.C., setting out from Thebes with a force amounting at first to sixty men; he also persuaded the Athenians, who were torn by factions, to be reconciled, and to abide by their compact. His is the first grave, and after it come those of Pericles, ChabriasDied 357 B.C. and Phormio.A famous Athenian admiral who fought well in the early part of the Peloponnesian War. There is also a monument for all the Athenians whose fate it has been to fall in battle, whether at sea or on land, except such of them as fought at Marathon. These, for their valor, have their graves on the field of battle, but the others lie along the road to the Academy, and on their graves stand slabs bearing the name and parish of each. First were buried those who in Thrace, after a vict
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 2 (search)
e to them, and that if Thebes or any other state made war against them, they would have the better owing to their courage and resources. When Philomelus put all this before them, the Phocians were nothing loath, either because their judgment was blinded by heaven, or because their nature was to put gain before religion. The seizure of Delphi by the Phocians occurred when Heracleides was president at Delphi and Agathocles archon at Athens, in the fourth year of the hundred and fifth Olympiad,357 B.C when Prorus of Cyrene was victorious in the foot-race. When they had seized the sanctuary, the best mercenaries in Greece at once mustered to join them, while the Thebans, at variance before, declared open war against them. The war lasted ten successive years, and during this long time victory often fell to the Phocians and their mercenaries, and often the Thebans proved the better. An engagement took place at the town of Neon, in which the Phocians were worsted, and in the rout Philomelus