hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 24 24 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 7 7 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 2 Browse Search
Plato, Letters 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 3-4 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 5-7 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 8-10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin). You can also browse the collection for 367 BC or search for 367 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Isocrates, Archidamus (ed. George Norlin), section 45 (search)
Ashamed of what he had planned to do, and taking up the war afresh, he destroyed countless hosts of the Carthaginians,Dio. Sic. 14.72.6, says the shore was strewn with corpses. strengthened his authority over his subjects, acquired far greater dominion than he had possessed before, ruled with absolute power until his death,Dionysius died in the spring of 367 B.C. and left his son in possession of the same honors and powers as he himself had enjoyed.
Isocrates, Archidamus (ed. George Norlin), section 61 (search)
and that we still remain faithful to the customs and ways of life which we established here in the very beginning, while the rest of the Hellenes are not able to stand even their good fortune, but have become completely demoralized, some of them seizing the cities of their allies,That is, those of the Theban league. Isocrates is here describing Thebes and especially her allies in the Peloponnesus. others opposing them in this; some disputing with their neighbors about territory, others, again, indulging their envy of one anotherSee note a, p. 352. Xen. Hell. 7.1.32, says that the Thebans and Eleans were no less pleased at the defeat of their allies, the Arcadians, in the “tearless” battle of 367 B.C. than were the Lacedaemonians. rather than making war against us. Therefore I wonder at those who look for a stronger ally than is found in the blundering of our enemi