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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 24 24 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 7 7 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 8-10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 5-7 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography. You can also browse the collection for 367 BC or search for 367 BC in all documents.

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Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 1 (search)
of its fame (for the Samnitae might have called it by the Latin word for "royal,"Regium. because their progenitors had shared in the government with the Romans and used the Latin language to a considerable extent), is open to investigation. Be this as it may, it was a famous city, and not only founded many cities but also produced many notable men, some notable for their excellence as statesmen and others for their learning; nevertheless, DionysiusDionysius the Elder (b. about 432 B.C., d. 367 B.C.) demolished it, they say, on the charge that when he asked for a girl in marriage they proffered the daughter of the public executioner;Diod. Sic. 14.44 merely says that the Assembly of the Rhegini refused him a wife. but his son restored a part of the old city and called it Phoebia.Apparently in honor of Phoebus (Apollo); for, according to Plut. De Alexandri Virtute, (338) Dionysius the Younger called himself the son of Apollo, "offspring of his mother Doris by Phoebus." Now in the