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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 24 24 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 7 7 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 8-10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 5-7 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 8-10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 367 BC or search for 367 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.), chapter 7 (search)
there is said, however, to have been a vigorous discussion as to the passage or rejection of the bill, in which Appius Claudius and Publius Decius Mus were the principal speakers. after they had brought up nearly the same arguments concerning the rights of patricians and plebeians as had formerly been employed in behalf of and against the Licinian Law,Enacted 367 B.C. (vi. xxxv. 5). when the plebeians sought access to the consulship, it is related that Decius evoked the image of his father as he had been seen by many who were then present in the assembly, wearing his toga with the Gabine cincture,Prescribed in the ceremony of devotion, as in certain others. and standing over his weapon, as he had done when offering himself a sacrifice for the Roman People and the legions. Publius Decius the consul had on that occasion seemed to the immortal gods anB.C. 300 oblation no less pure and holy than if his colleague Titus Manlius had been offered up; could not then this