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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 18 18 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Aristotle, Metaphysics 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.). You can also browse the collection for 380 BC or search for 380 BC in all documents.

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Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK XXI. AN ACCOUNT OF FLOWERS. AND THOSE USED FOR CHAPLETS MORE PARTICULARLY., CHAP. 3.—WHO INVENTED THE ART OF MAKING GARLANDS: WHEN THEY FIRST RECEIVED THE NAME OF "COROLLÆ," AND FOR WHAT REASON. (search)
ose handiwork was imitated by him in colours. Challenging him to a trial of skill, she would repeatedly vary her designs, and thus it was in reality a contest between art and Nature; a fact which we find attested by pictures of that artist even still in existence, more particularly the one known as the "Stephane- plocos,"The "Chaplet-weaver." Sec B. xxxv. c. 40. in which he has given a likeness of Glycera herself. This invention, therefore, is only to be traced to later than the HundredthB.C. 380. Olympiad. Chaplets of flowers being now the fashion, it was not long before those came into vogue which are known to us as EgyptianFrom Athenæus, B. xv. c. 2, et seq., we learn that the Egyptian chaplets were made of ivy, narcissus, pomegranate blossoms, &c. chaplets; and then the winter chaplets, made for the time at which Earth refuses her flowers, of thin laminæ of horn stained various colours. By slow degrees, too, the name was introduced at Rome, these garlands being known there at f
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK XXXVII. THE NATURAL HISTORY OF PRECIOUS STONES., CHAP. 77.—A COMPARATIVE VIEW OF NATURE AS SHE APPEARS IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES. THE COMPARATIVE VALUES OF THINGS. (search)
of the Triumphs,See end of B. v. Mæcenas,See end of B. ix. Iacchus,See end of B. xxxii. Cornelius Bocchus.See end of B. xvi. FOREIGN AUTHORS QUOTED.—King Juba,See end of B. v. XenocratesSee end of B. xxxiii. the son of Zeno, Sudines,See end of B. xxxvi. Æschylus,See end of B. x. Philoxenus,A Dithyrambic poet, a native of Cythera. or, according to some, of Heraclea in Pontus. During the latter part of his life he resided at the court of the younger Dionysius, tyrant of Sicily, and died B.C. 380, at the age of 55. Of his poems, only a few fragments are left. Euripides,One of the great Tragic Poets of Greece, born at Salamis B.C. 480. Of his Tragedies, eighteen are still extant, out of seventy-five, or, according to some accounts, ninety-two, which he originally wrote. Nicander,See end of B. viii. Satyrus,Nothing positive seems to be known of this author, who is mentioned in Chapters 11, 24, and 25 of the present Book as having written on Precious Stones. It is possible that he may ha