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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 16 16 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 5 5 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 2 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 1 1 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for 387 BC or search for 387 BC in all documents.

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Polybius, Histories, book 4, Disingenuous Policy of the Spartans (search)
enuousness. I can find no word which better describes such a treacherous policy; and I will quote two instances to show what I mean by it. B. C. 382. When Phoebidas treacherously seized the Cadmeia, the Lacedaemonians fined the guilty general but declined to withdraw the garrison, on the ground that the wrong was fully atoned for by the punishment of the perpetrator of it: though their plain duty was to have done the reverse, for it was the latter which was of importance to the Thebans. B. C. 387. Again this same people published a proclamation giving the various cities freedom and autonomy in accordance with the terms of the peace of Antalcidas, and yet did not withdraw their Harmosts from the cities. B. C. 385. Again, having driven the Mantineans from their home, who were at the time their friends and allies, they denied that they were doing any wrong, inasmuch as they removed them from one city and settled them in several. But indeed a man is a fool, as much as a knave, if he imagi
Polybius, Histories, book 6, The Defect in the Spartan Constitution (search)
is known to all that in their efforts for supremacy in Greece they submitted to do the bidding of those whom they had once conquered in war. Battle of Plataea, B. C. 479. For when the Persians invaded Greece, they conquered them, as champions of the liberty of the Greeks; yet when the invaders had retired and fled, they betrayed the cities of Greece into their hands by the peace of Antalcidas, for the sake of getting money to secure their supremacy over the Greeks. Peace of Antalcidas, B. C. 387. It was then that the defect in their constitution was rendered apparent. The causes of this failure. For as long as their ambition was confined to governing their immediate neighbours, or even the Peloponnesians only, they were content with the resources and supplies provided by Laconia itself, having all material of war ready to hand, and being able without much expenditure of time to return home or convey provisions with them. But directly they took in hand to despatch naval expeditions, o