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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 29 29 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 12 12 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 11 11 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 2 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 2 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for 390 BC or search for 390 BC in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 24 (search)
olds a statue of Victory about four cubits high, and in the other hand a spear; at her feet lies a shield and near the spear is a serpent. This serpent would be Erichthonius. On the pedestal is the birth of Pandora in relief. Hesiod and others have sung how this Pandora was the first woman; before Pandora was born there was as yet no womankind. The only portrait statue I remember seeing here is one of the emperor Hadrian, and at the entrance one of Iphicrates,A famous Athenian soldier.fl. 390 B.C. who accomplished many remarkable achievements. Opposite the temple is a bronze Apollo, said to be the work of Pheidias. They call it the Locust God, because once when locusts were devastating the land the god said that he would drive them from Attica. That he did drive them away they know, but they do not say how. I myself know that locusts have been destroyed three times in the past on Mount Sipylus, and not in the same way. Once a gale arose and swept them away; on another occasion vi
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Laconia, chapter 10 (search)
o Sparta, they too celebrated the Isthmian games along with the Argives. Agesilaus again marched with an army against Corinth, and, as the festival Hyacinthia was at hand, he gave the Amycleans leave to go back home and perform the traditional rites in honor of Apollo and Hyacinthus. This battalion was attacked on the way and annihilated by the Athenians under Iphicrates. Agesilaus went also to Aetolia to give assistance to the Aetolians, who were hard pressed in a war with, the Acarnanians;390 B.C. these he compelled to put an end to the war, although they had come very near capturing Calydon and the other towns of the Aetolians. Afterwards he sailed to Egypt, to succor the Egyptians who had revolted from the king of Persia. Agesilaus performed many noteworthy achievements in Egypt, but, being by this time ah old man, he died on the march. then his dead body was brought home, the Lacedaemonians buried it with greater honors than they had given to any other king. In the reign of Archid