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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 14 14 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 7 7 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 8-10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 391 BC or search for 391 BC in all documents.

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Appuleius or APULEIUS. 1. L. Appuleius, tribune of the plebs, B. C. 391, impeached Camillus for having secreted part of the spoils of Veii. (Liv. 5.32; Plut. Cam. 12.)
Caedi'cius 2. M. Caedicius, is said to have told the tribunes of the plebs, in B. C. 391, that he had heard, in the silence of the night, a superhuman voice, commanding him to inform the magistrates that the Gauls were coming. (Liv. 5.32; Plut. Camill. 14; Zonaras, 7.23.) This appears to be the same Caedicius, a centurion, who was elected as their commander by the Romans that had fled to Veii after the destruction of the city by the Gauls, B. C. 390. He led out his countrymen against the Etruscans, who availed themselves of the misfortunes of the Romans to plunder the Veientine territory. After this he proposed that Camillus should be invited to become their general, and according to another account he himself carried to Camillus the decree of the senate appointing him to the command. (Liv. 5.45, 46; Appian, Celt. 5.)
against Veii, and succeeded in reducing the town, in the tenth year of the war. Here he acquired immense booty, and had the statue of Juno Regina removed to Rome, where it was set up in a special temple on the Aventine, which was consecrated in B. C. 391, the year in which he celerated the great games he had vowed. On his return from Veii, he entered Rome in triumph, riding in a chariot drawn by white horses. In B. C. 394 he was elected consular tribune for the third time, and reduced the Falise of the Roman general, that they surrendered to the Romans. (Liv. 5.27; comp. V. Max. 6.5.1, who calls Camillus consul on this occasion, although, according to the express testimony of Plutarch, he was never invested with the consulship.) In B. C. 391, Camillus was chosen interrex to take the auspices, as the other magistrates were attacked by an epidemic then raging at Rome, by which he also lost a son. In this year he was accused by the tribune of the plebs, L. Appuleius, with having made
Di'phridas (*Difri/das), a Lacedaemonian, was sent out to Asia, in B. C. 391, after the death of Thibron, to gather together the relics of his army, and, having raised fresh troops, to protect the states that were friendly to Sparta, and prosecute the war with Struthas. With manners no less agreeable than those of his predecessor, he had more steadiness and energy of character. He therefore soon retrieved the affairs of Lacedaemon, and, having captured Tigranes, the son-in-law of Struthas, together with his wife, he obtained a large ransom for their release, and was thus enabled to raise and support a body of mercenaries. (Xen. Hell. 4.8. §§ 21, 22.) Diphridas, the Ephor, who is mentioned by Plutarch (Plut. Ages. 17) as being sent forward to meet Agesilaus, then at Narthacium in Thessaly, and to desire him to advance at once into Boeotia, B. C. 394. (Comp. Xen. Hell. 4.3.9.) The name Diphridas, as it seems, should be substituted for Diphilas in Diod. 14.97. [
E'cdicus (*)/Ekdikos), a Lacedaemonian, was sent out with eight ships, in B. C. 391, to put down the democratic party in Rhodes. On his arrival however at Cnidus, he found that the forces of his opponents doubled his own, and he was therefore obliged to remain inactive. The Lacedaemonians, when they heard that he was not in a condition to effect anything, sent Teleutias with a larger armament to supersede him. (Xen. Hell. 4.8. §§ 20-23 ; comp. Diod. 14.79, 97.) [
Fusus 2. AGRIPPA FURIUS FUSUS, consular tribune in B. C. 391, the year before the taking of Rome by the Gauls. (Liv. 5.32; Fasti Capitol.)
Mamerci'nus 6. L. Aemilius Mam. F. M. N. MAMERCINUS, son of No. 3, was consular tribune seven times, first in B. C. 391 (Fast. Capit.), a second time in 389, a third time in 387, a fourth time in 383, a fifth time in 382. a sixth time in 380, and a seventh time ill 377. (Liv. 6.1, , 21, 22, 27, 32.)
Medulli'nus 10. L. Furius Sp. N. Medullinus, L. F., was seven times military tribune with consular authority: I. B. C. 407 (Liv. 4.57); 2.405, in the year the siege of Veil began (id. ib. 61); III. B. C. 398 (Liv. 5.12); 4.397 (Liv. 5.14); V. ;95 (id. ib. 24); 6.394 (id. ib. 26); VII. B. C. 391 (id. ib. 32; Fasti).
oned by name, there are passages which are, to all appearance, parodies upon his poem entitled *Dei=pnon (Fr. xii. xiii. ed. Bergk, ap. Meineke, Frag. Com. Graec. vol. ii. pp. 1009, 1010). In the Ecclesiazusae also, B. C. 392, there is a passage which is almost certainly a similar parody (vv. 1167-1178; Bergk, Comment. de Reliq. Comoed. Att. Antiq. p. 212). There is also a long passage in the Phaon of the comic poet Plato, which seems to have been acted in the year after the Ecclesiazusae, B. C. 391, professing to be read from a book, which the person who has it calls *Filoce/nou kainh/ tis o'yartusi/a which is almost certainly a pairody on tice same poem, although Athenaeus and some modern critics suppose the allusion to be to a poem by Philoxenus, the Leucadian, on the art of cookery. It is true that the latter was known for his fondness of luxurious living; but the coincidence would be too remarkable, and the confusion between the two Philoxeni utterly hopeless, if we were to suppo
oned by name, there are passages which are, to all appearance, parodies upon his poem entitled *Dei=pnon (Fr. xii. xiii. ed. Bergk, ap. Meineke, Frag. Com. Graec. vol. ii. pp. 1009, 1010). In the Ecclesiazusae also, B. C. 392, there is a passage which is almost certainly a similar parody (vv. 1167-1178; Bergk, Comment. de Reliq. Comoed. Att. Antiq. p. 212). There is also a long passage in the Phaon of the comic poet Plato, which seems to have been acted in the year after the Ecclesiazusae, B. C. 391, professing to be read from a book, which the person who has it calls *Filoce/nou kainh/ tis o'yartusi/a which is almost certainly a pairody on tice same poem, although Athenaeus and some modern critics suppose the allusion to be to a poem by Philoxenus, the Leucadian, on the art of cookery. It is true that the latter was known for his fondness of luxurious living; but the coincidence would be too remarkable, and the confusion between the two Philoxeni utterly hopeless, if we were to suppo
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