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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 16 16 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 9 9 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham) 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham). You can also browse the collection for 392 BC or search for 392 BC in all documents.

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Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham), Book 3, chapter 8 (search)
one can foresee, from calculation and on principle, but only a fixed disposition of Courage will enable one to face sudden peril. (5) Those who face danger in ignorance also appear courageous; and they come very near to those whose bravery rests on a sanguine temperament, though inferior to them inasmuch as they lack self-confidence, which the sanguine possess. Hence the sanguine stand firm for a time; whereas those who have been deceived as to the danger, if they learn or suspect the true state of affairs, take to flight, as the Argives did when they encountered the Lacedaemonians and thought they were Sicyonians.This occurred in the battle at the Long Walls of Corinth, 392 B.C. Lacedaemonian cavalry had dismounted and armed themselves with the shields of the routed Sicyonians, marked *s (Xen. Hell. 4.4.10). We have now described the characteristics both of the courageous and of those who are thought to be cou