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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 54 54 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus 3 3 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 3 3 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 2 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 2 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 1 1 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for 411 BC or search for 411 BC in all documents.

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Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1304b (search)
times fraud. Force is employed either when the revolutionary leaders exert compulsion immediately from the start or later on—as indeed the mode of using fraud is also twofold: sometimes the revolutionaries after completely deceiving the people at the first stage alter the constitution with their consent, but then at a later stage retain their hold on it by force against the people's will: for instance, at the time of the Four Hundred,The oligarchy at Athens 411 B.C., cf. 1305a 27. they deceived the people by saying that the Persian King would supply money for the war against the Spartans, and after telling them this falsehood endeavored to keep a hold upon the government; but in other cases they both persuade the people at the start and afterwards repeat the persuasion and govern them with their consent.Speaking generally therefore in regard to all the forms of constitution, the causes that have been stated are th
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1310a (search)
to pretend to be speaking on behalf of men that are well-to-do, while in democracies the oligarchical statesmen ought to pretend to be speaking on behalf of the people, and the oligarchics ought to take oath in terms exactly opposite to those which they use now, for at present in some oligarchies they swear, “And I will be hostile to the people and will plan whatever evil I can against them,”The ‘scoffing anapaestic cadence’ of this oath has been noted. In 411 B.C. the democratic reaction at Athens swore ‘to be enemies of the Four Hundred and to hold no parley with them.’ but they ought to hold, and to act the part of holding, the opposite notion, declaring in their oaths, “I will not wrong the people.” But the greatest of all the means spoken of to secure the stability of constitutions is one that at present all people despise: it is a system of education suited to the constitutions. For there is no us