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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 33 33 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 3 3 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Aristotle, Metaphysics 1 1 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for 420 BC or search for 420 BC in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 29 (search)
Demosthenes made a truce for the others and excluded himself, attempting to commit suicide when taken prisoner, Nicias voluntarily submitted to the surrender.413 B.C. For this reason Nicias had not his name inscribed on the slab, being condemned as a voluntary prisoner and an unworthy soldier. On another slab are the names of those who fought in the region of Thrace and at Megara445 B.C., and when Alcibiades persuaded the Arcadians in Mantinea and the Eleans to revolt from the Lacedaemonians420 B.C., and of those who were victorious over the Syracusans before Demosthenes arrived in Sicily. Here were buried also those who fought in the sea-fights near the Hellespont409 B.C., those who opposed the Macedonians at Charonea338 B.C.>, those who marched with Cleon to Amphipolis<422 B.C., those who were killed at Delium in the territory of Tanagra424 B.C., the men Leosthenes led into Thessaly, those who sailed with Cimon to Cyprus449 B.C., and of those who with OlympiodorusSee Paus. 1.26.3. ex
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 4 (search)
ent records of Elis traced him to a father of the same name. The Eleans played their part in the Trojan war, and also in the battles of the Persian invasion of Greece. I pass over their struggles with the Pisans and Arcadians for the management of the Olympian games. Against their will they joined the Lacedaemonians in their invasion of Athenian territory, and shortly afterwards they rose up with the Mantineans and Argives against the Lacedaemonians, inducing Athens too to join the alliance.420 B.C. When Agis invaded the land, and Xenias turned traitor, the Eleans won a battle near Olympia, routed the Lacedaemonians and drove them out of the sacred enclosure; but shortly afterwards the war was concluded by the treaty I have already spoken of in my account of the Lacedaemonians.401-399 B.C.See Paus. 3.8. When Philip the son of Amyntas would not let Greece alone, the Eleans, weakened by civil strife, joined the Macedonian alliance, but they could not bring themselves to fight against the
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 12 (search)
of bronze. Of the statues set up in the round buildings, the amber one represents Augustus the Roman emperor, the ivory one they told me was a portrait of Nicomedes, king of Bithynia. After him the greatest city in Bithynia was renamed Nicomedeia264 B.C.; before him it was called Astacus, and its first founder was Zypoetes, a Thracian by birth to judge from his name. This amber of which the statue of Augustus is made, when found native in the sand of the Eridanus, is very rare and precious to men for many reasons; the other “amber” is an alloy of gold and silver. In the temple at Olympia are four offerings of Nero—three crowns representing wild-olive leaves, and one representing oak leaves. Here too are laid twenty-five bronze shields, which are for the armed men to carry in the race. Tablets too are set up, including one on which is written the oath sworn by the Eleans to the Athenians, the Argives and the Mantineans, that they would be their allies for a hundred years.420 B.C.