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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 27 27 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 2 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 2 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Acharnians (ed. Anonymous) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for 427 BC or search for 427 BC in all documents.

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Aristotle, Politics, Book 3, section 1275b (search)
itizens on both sides, not on one side only, that is, the child of a citizen father or of a citizen mother; and other people carry this requirement further back, for example to the second or the third preceding generation or further. But given this as a practical and hasty definition, some people raise the difficulty, How will that ancestor three or four generations back have been a citizen? GorgiasSicilian orator and nihilistic philosopher, visited Athens 427 B.C. of Leontini therefore, partly perhaps in genuine perplexity but partly in jest, said that just as the vessels made by mortar-makers were mortars, so the citizens made by the magistrates were Larisaeans, since some of the magistrates were actually larisa-makers.Larisa, a city in Thessaly, was famous for the manufacture of a kind of kettle called ‘larisa.’ But it is really a simple matter; for if they possessed citizenship in the manner stated in our definition
Aristotle, Politics, Book 3, section 1284a (search)
is that Periander made no reply to the herald sent to ask his advice, but levelled the corn-field by plucking off the ears that stood out above the rest; and consequently, although the herald did not know the reason for what was going on, when he carried back news of what had occurred, Thrasybulus understood that he was to destroy the outstanding citizens); for this policy is advantageous not only for tyrants, nor is it only tyrants that use it, but the same is the case with oligarchies and democracies as well; for ostracism has in a way the same effect as docking off the outstanding men by exile. And the same course is adopted in regard to cities and races by the holders of sovereign power, for example the Athenians so dealt with the Samians and Chians and LesbiansIn 440, 424 and 427 B.C. respectively (for no sooner did they get a strong hold of their empire than they humbled them in contravention of their covenant