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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 38 38 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 3 3 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 431 BC or search for 431 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, APOLLINARE (search)
APOLLINARE a precinct in the prata Flaminia, sacred to Apollo (see APOLLO, AEDES), where the first temple to this divinity was dedicated in 431 B.C. (Liv. iii. 63; Jord. ii. 265; RE i. 2842; HJ 535).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, APOLLO, AEDES (search)
APOLLO, AEDES (delubrum, Pliny bis, templum, id. bis): the first temple of Apollo in Rome, in the campus Martius, vowed in 433 B.C. because of a plague that had raged in the city (Liv. iv. 25. 3), and dedicated in 431 by the consul Cn. Julius (Liv. iv. 29. 7). It was in or close to an earlier cult centre of the god, the APOLLINAR (q.v.), either a grove or altar. This was the only temple of Apollo in Rome until Augustus built that on the Palatine (Asc. in Cic. orat. in tog. cand. 90-91), and being a foreign cult was outside the pomerium (extra urbem, Liv. xxxiv. 43. 2; xxxvii. 58. 3). Therefore it was a regular place for extra-pomerial meetings of the senate (Liv. locc. citt.; xxxix. 4. I; xli. 17. 4; Cic. ad Q. fr. ii. 3. 3; ad fam. viii. 4. 4, 8. 5, 6; ad Att. xv. 3. I; cf. Lucan iii. 103: Phoebeia palatia complet turba patrum nullo cogendi iure senatus). The site is variously described as extra portam Carmentalem inter forum holitorium et circum Flaminium (Asc. loc. cit.),
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CAMPUS MARTIUS (search)
comitia voted came to be known as ovile or saepta (q.v.; Serv. Ecl. i. 33 et al.). Audience was given here to foreign ambassadors who could not enter the city (Liv. xxx. 21. 12 ; xxxiii. 24. 5), and foreign cults were domiciled in temples erected here. We know certainly of only three other cult centres besides that of Mars in the campus Martius before the Punic wars-the ara Ditis et Proserpinae in Tarento, the Apollinare, an altar or grove, and the temple of Apollo which was built in 431 B.C., and the temple of Bellona built in 296 B.C. Between 231 and the battle of Actium at least fifteen other temples were erected, and more during the next century. The construction of the circus Flaminius in 221 B.C. marked an epoch in the history of the southern part of the campus, but there was no public building of any note in the campus Martius proper before the end of the republic, when Pompeius built the first stone theatre in Rome in 55 B.C. Caesar conceived the idea of changin