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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 146 146 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 20 20 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 20 20 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 16 16 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 10 10 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 9 9 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for 44 BC or search for 44 BC in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 1 (search)
in the war against the Romans, which Critolaus, when appointed general of the Achaeans, brought about by persuading to revolt both the Achaeans and the majority of the Greeks outside the Peloponnesus. When the Romans won the war, they carried out a general disarmament of the Greeks146 B.C. and dismantled the walls of such cities as were fortified. Corinth was laid waste by Mummius, who at that time commanded the Romans in the field, and it is said that it was afterwards refounded by Caesar,44 B.C. who was the author of the present constitution of Rome. Carthage, too, they say, was refounded in his reign. In the Corinthian territory is also the place called Cromyon from Cromus the son of Poseidon. Here they say that Phaea was bred; overcoming this sow was one of the traditional achievements of Theseus. Farther on the pine still grew by the shore at the time of my visit, and there was an altar of Melicertes. At this place, they say, the boy was brought ashore by a dolphin; Sisyphus fou
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 1 (search)
rians, they did not retire from Peloponnesus, but they cast out the Ionians and occupied the land called of old Aegialus, but now called Achaea from these Achaeans. The Arcadians, on the other hand, have from the beginning to to the present time continued in possession of their own country. The rest of Peloponnesus belongs to immigrants. The modern Corinthians are the latest inhabitants of Peloponnesus, and from my time174 A.D. to the time when they received their land from the Roman Emperor44 B.C. is two hundred and seventeen years. The Dryopians reached the Peloponnesus from Parnassus, the Dorians from Oeta. The Eleans we know crossed over from Calydon and Aetolia generally. Their earlier history I found to be as follows. The first to rule in this land, they say, was Aethlius, who was the son of Zeus and of Protogeneia, the daughter of Deucalion, and the father of Endymion. The Moon, they say, fell in love with this Endymion and bore him fifty daughters. Others with greater probabil