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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 146 146 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 20 20 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 20 20 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 16 16 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 10 10 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 9 9 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White). You can also browse the collection for 44 BC or search for 44 BC in all documents.

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Appian, Illyrian Wars (ed. Horace White), CHAPTER III (search)
his preparations B.C. 45 against the Parthians; nevertheless, he gave them the dignified answer that he could not make friends of those who had done what they had, but that he would grant them pardon if they would subject themselves to tribute and give him hostages. They promised to do both, and accordingly he sent Vatinius thither with three legions and a large cavalry force to impose a light tribute on them and receive the Y.R. 710 hostages. When Cæsar was slain the Dalmatians, thinking B.C. 44 that the Roman power resided in him and had perished with him, would not listen to Vatinius on the subject of the tribute or anything else. When he attempted to use force they attacked and destroyed five of his cohorts, including their commanding officer, Bæbius, a man of senatorial rank. Vatinius took refuge with the remainder of his force in Epidamnus. The Roman Senate transferred this army, together with the province of Macedonia and Roman Illyria, to Brutus Cæpio, one of Cæsar's murderers,