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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 18 18 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Aristotle, Poetics 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for 445 BC or search for 445 BC in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 8 (search)
of Heracles, Theseus, Apollo binding his hair with a fillet, and statues of Calades,Nothing more is known of this person. who it is said framed lawsOr “tunes.” for the Athenians, and of Pindar, the statue being one of the rewards the Athenians gave him for praising them in an ode. Hard by stand statues of Harmodius and Aristogiton, who killed Hipparchus.514 B.C. The reason of this act and the method of its execution have been related by others; of the figures some were made by Critiusfl. c. 445 B.C., the old ones being the work of Antenor. When Xerxes took Athens after the Athenians had abandoned the city he took away these statues also among the spoils, but they were afterwards restored to the Athenians by Antiochus. Before the entrance of the theater which they call the Odeum (Music Hall) are statues of Egyptian kings. They are all alike called Ptolemy, but each has his own surname. For they call one Philometor, and another Philadelphus, while the son of Lagus is called Soter, a n
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 29 (search)
Boeotians, were afterwards at Leuctra so utterly overthrown by the Boeotians alone. After those who were killed at Corinth, we come across elegiac verses declaring that one and the same slab has been erected to those who died in Euboea and Chios445 B.C., and to those who perished in the remote parts of the continent of Asia, or in Sicily. The names of the generals are inscribed with the exception of Nicias, and among the private soldiers are included the Plataeans along with the Athenians. Thitted to the surrender.413 B.C. For this reason Nicias had not his name inscribed on the slab, being condemned as a voluntary prisoner and an unworthy soldier. On another slab are the names of those who fought in the region of Thrace and at Megara445 B.C., and when Alcibiades persuaded the Arcadians in Mantinea and the Eleans to revolt from the Lacedaemonians420 B.C., and of those who were victorious over the Syracusans before Demosthenes arrived in Sicily. Here were buried also those who fought