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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 124 124 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 25 25 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 25 25 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 20 20 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 2 Browse Search
Sulpicia, Carmina Omnia (ed. Anne Mahoney) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 45 BC or search for 45 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CURIA HOSTILIA (search)
d the Carthaginians in 263 B.C. (Plin. NH xxxv. 22; see TABULA VALERIA (2)). It was restored by Sulla in 80 B.C. and somewhat enlarged, the statues of Pythagoras and Alcibiades, which had stood at the corners of the Comitium, being removed (Plin. xxxiv. 26; cf. Dio xl. 49). In 52 B.C. it was burnt down by the partisans of Clodius and rebuilt by Sulla's son Faustus (Cic. pro Mil. 90, and Ascon. in loc. ; Pp. 29, 40, ed. Kiessling and Schoell. Dio, loc. cit.; Cic. de fin. v. 2 (written in 45 B.C.): Curiam nostram, Hostiliam dico, non hanc novam, quae minor mihi videtur postquam est maior, must also refer to this curia, and not to that of the elder Sulla, as Richter, 94, thinks). In 44 B.C. it was decided to build a new curia (Dio xliv. 5: e)peidh\ to\ *osti/lion kai/per a)noikodomhqe\n kaqh|re/qh). Part of its site was occupied by the temple of FELICITAS (q.v.). The curia was, like the comitium, inaugurated as a templum (Varro ap. Gell. xiv. 7. 7). According to what we know of the
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ROSTRA (search)
re above the floor of the Comitium.' It has a fine pavement of Monte Verde tufa, along the front of which runs a raised kerb. According to one view these monuments are attributable to the period of Sulla (JRS 1922, 21-25 ; Mitt. 1905, 32-39; TF 61-66). Whether the 'Tomb of Romulus ' was hidden from view at this period or later, is uncertain. The curved front of the rostra, as represented by the canalis with the beaks of ships with which it was adorned, is held to be represented in a coin of 45 B.C. of Lollius Palikanus (HC p. 69, fig. 26; BM. Rep. i. 517, 4011-3). The arcade at the back of the rostra Augusti, which Boni (NS 1900, 627-634) has called the rostra Caesaris, belongs to the time of Sulla, and is simply a low viaduct to support the CLIVUS CAPITOLINUS (q.v.) and a street branching off from it (P1. 227-228; CR 1901, 87-89; HC cit., Mitt. 1902, 13-16; 1905, 14-15, 25; JRS 1922, 15-16). On the rostra, see Jord. i. 2. 353-355; Petersen, Comitium, Rostra, Grab des Romulus (Rome 19