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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 14 14 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham) 1 1 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 1 1 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Diodorus Siculus, Library. You can also browse the collection for 456 BC or search for 456 BC in all documents.

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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 84 (search)
456 B.C.While Callias was archon in athens, in Elis the Eighty-first Olympiad was celebrated, that in which Polymnastus of Cyrene won the "stadion," and in Rome the consuls were Servius Sulpicius and Publius Volumnius Amentinus. During this year Tolmides, who was commander of the naval forces and vied with both the valour and fame of Myronides, was eager to accomplish a memorable deed. Consequently, since in those times no one had very yet laid waste Laconia, he urged the Athenian people to ravage the territory of the Spartans, and he promised that by taking one thousand hoplites aboard the triremes he would with them lay waste Laconia and dim the fame of the Spartans. When the Athenians acceded to his request, he then, wishing to take with him secretly a larger number of hoplites, had recourse to the following cunning subterfuge. The citizens thought that he would enrol for the force the young men in the prime of youth and most
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 48 (search)
s. Accordingly the Corcyraeans, seeing that their most influential citizens were planning to hand the city over to the Lacedaemonians, sent to the Athenians for an army to protect their city. And Conon, the general of the Athenians, sailed to Corcyra and left in the city six hundred men from the Messenians in Naupactus,These Messenians had been allowed by the Spartans to leave their country and had been settled in Naupactus by the Athenian general Tolmides in 456 B.C. (cp. Book 11.84). while he himself sailed on with his ships and cast anchor off the sacred precinct of Hera. And the six hundred, setting out unexpectedly with the partisans of the people's party at the time of full marketIn the middle of the morning. against the supporters of the Lacedaemonians, arrested some of them, slew others, and drove more than a thousand from the state; they also set the slaves free and gave citizenship to the foreigners living among