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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 460 BC or search for 460 BC in all documents.

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Olympus (*)/Olumpos), a statuary, whose country is unknown, and respecting whose date it can only be said that he lived later than the 80th Olympiad, B. C. 460 [OEBOTAS]. He made the statue at Olympia of the pancratiast Xenophon, the son of Menephvlus, of Aegium of Achaea. (Paus. 6.3.5. s. 14.) [P.
Ona'tas (*)Ona/tas) of Aegina, the son of Micon, was a distinguished statuary and painter, contemporary with Polygnotus, Ageladas, and Hegias. From the various notices of him it nmav be collected that he flourished down to about (1. 80, B. C. 460, that is, in the age immediately preceding that of Phidias. It is uncertain whether his father Micon was the great painter of that name. The works of Onatas are frequently described by Pausanias, who is, however, the only ancient writer who mentions him, with the exception of a single epigram in the Greek anthology. Pausanias also says that, though he called himself an Aeginetan on his works, he was inferior to none of the artists from Daedalus and the Attic school (5.25.7. s. 13 : *To\n de *)Ona/tan tou=ton o(/mws, kai\ te/xnhs e)s ta\ a)ga/lmata O)/nta *Ai)ginai/as, ou)deno\s u(/steron qh/somen tw=n a)po\ *Daida/lou te kai\ e)rgasthri/ou tou= *(Attikou=). Pausanias mentions the following works of Onatas :
works about B. C. 477 [CRITIOS]; and Onatas, who was contemporary with Polygnotus, was reckoned as a Daedaliani artist, and clearly belonged to the archaic school, wrought, with Calamis, in B. C. 467, and probably flourished as late as late as B. C. 460. Calamis, though contemporary with Onatas, seems to have been younger, and his name (as the above citations show) marks the introduction of a less rigid style of art [CALAMSIS * It is, however, far from certain that the statue of Apollo Alexicahena Promachus would probably also, for the sane reason of discharging a religious duty, be among the first works undertaken for the ornament of the city, and we shall probably not be far wrong in assigning the execution of it to about the year B. C. 460. This work, from all we know of it, must have established his reputation; but it was surpassed by the splendid productions of his own hand, and of others working under his direction, during the administration of Pericles. That statesman not onl
survived him only a few years, and having commenced his artistic career about the same period : for, not to insist on the probability that Pheidias had some share in the works at the temple of Theseus, we know that both artists worked at about the same time for the temple of Athena Areia at Plataeae, where Polygnotus (in conjunction with Onatas) painted the walls of the portico, and Pheidias made the acrolith statue of the goddess : the date of these works may be assumed to have been about B. C. 460, or a little later. Again, about the end of their career, we find, at the Propylaea, the paintings of Polygnotus decorating the latest edifices which were erected under the superintendence of Pheidias. Thus, it appears that the causes which produced that sudden advance in the formative art of statuary, of which Pheidias was the leader, produced also a similar advance in the representative art of painting, as practised by Polygnotus. The periods of the essential development of each art were
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Poti'tus, Vale'rius 2. L. Valerius Potitus, consul with M. Horatius Barbatus, In B. C. 449. Dionysius calls him a grandson of the great P. Valerius Publicola, and a son of the P. Valerius Publicola, who was consul in B. C. 460, and who was killed that year in the assault of the Capitol, which had been seized by Herdonius (Dionys. A. R. 11.4); and hence we find him described as L. Valerius Publicola Potitus. But we think it more probable that he was the son or grandson of L.Valerius Potitus [No. 1]; first, because we find that Livy, Cicero, and Dionysius, invariably give him the surname of Potitus, and never that of Publicola, and secondly because the great popularity of Potitus would naturally give origin to the tradition that he was a lineal descendant of that member of the gens, who took such a prominent part in the expulsion of the kings. The annals of the Valeria gens recorded that L. Valerius Potitus was the first person who offered opposition to the decemvirs; and whether thi
Praxi'damas (*Pracida/mas). 1. A writer on poetry or music, probably the latter. Suidas is the only author who expressly mentions him (s. v. yia/zein). Harpocration (s. v. *Mousai=os) seems to allude to memoirs of Praxidamas, written by Aristoxenus. He must, therefore, have lived between the time of Democritus, B. C. 460, and that of Aristoxenus, B. C. 320. (See Jonsius, de Script. Hist. Phil. 1.14. 8, &c
ibri duo, ed. Basil. 1537, p. 3). It is probable that Simon was an Athenian, from the place in which his offering was deposited; and by Suidas, who has quoted Simon (s. v. *Tri/llh), he is expressly called an Athenian. According to Suidas, in one of the above places (s. v. *Ki/mwn), he was banished from Athens, by ostracism, on account of his having committed incest. Of the age of Simon we can only form an approximate estimate. He was not earlier than the painter Micon, who lived about B. C. 460 [MICON, artists, 1], for he criticised the works of that artist (Pollux, Onomasticon, lib. 2.69); and he wrote earlier than Xenophon (who, as we see below, cites him), but how much earlier we have no means of knowing, except that his treatise had already acquired a good reputation. Works According to Suidas (l.c.) Simon wrote, *(Ippo+iatriko/n, De Arte Veterinaria ; and if, which is probable, he is also mentioned by Suidas in two other places (s. vv. *)/Agurtos and *Ki/mwn), where, howe
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Simon HIPPIATRICUS (search)
ibri duo, ed. Basil. 1537, p. 3). It is probable that Simon was an Athenian, from the place in which his offering was deposited; and by Suidas, who has quoted Simon (s. v. *Tri/llh), he is expressly called an Athenian. According to Suidas, in one of the above places (s. v. *Ki/mwn), he was banished from Athens, by ostracism, on account of his having committed incest. Of the age of Simon we can only form an approximate estimate. He was not earlier than the painter Micon, who lived about B. C. 460 [MICON, artists, 1], for he criticised the works of that artist (Pollux, Onomasticon, lib. 2.69); and he wrote earlier than Xenophon (who, as we see below, cites him), but how much earlier we have no means of knowing, except that his treatise had already acquired a good reputation. Works According to Suidas (l.c.) Simon wrote, *(Ippo+iatriko/n, De Arte Veterinaria ; and if, which is probable, he is also mentioned by Suidas in two other places (s. vv. *)/Agurtos and *Ki/mwn), where, howe
nd the other the mimographer. The time at which Sophron flourished is loosely stated by Suidas as "the times of Xerxes and Euripides ;" but we have another evidence for his date in the statement that his son Xenarchus lived at the court of Dionysius I., during the Rhegian War (B. C. 399-387; see Clinton, F. H. s. a. 393). All that can be said, therefore, with any certainty, is that Sophron flourished during the middle, and perhaps the latter part of the fifth century B. C., perhaps about B. C. 460-420. rather more than half a century later than Epicharmus. Works Mimes When Sophron is called the inventor of mimes, the meaning is, as in the case of similar statements respecting the other branches of Dorian Comedy, that he reduced to the form of a literary composition a species of amusement which the Greeks of Sicily, who were pre-eminent for broad humour and merriment, had practised from time immemorial at their public festivals, and the nature of which was very similar to the pe
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