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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 9 9 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 1 1 Browse Search
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Aristotle, Politics, Book 2, section 1267b (search)
ly owned slaves and are not to furnish any complement of the citizen-body. But if it is proper to have public slaves, the laborers employed upon the public works ought to be of that status (as is the case at Epidamnus and as Diophantus once tried to institute at Athens).These remarks may serve fairly well to indicate such meritsand defects as may be contained in the constitution of Phaleas.HippodamusA famous architect and town-planner (see 1330b 24) circa 475 B.C. son of Euryphon, a Milesian (who invented the division of cities into blocks and cut up Piraeus, and who also became somewhat eccentric in his general mode of life owing to a desire for distinction, so that some people thought that he lived too fussily, with a quantity of hairAt Sparta men wore their hair long, but at Athens this was the mark of a dandy. and expensive ornaments, and also a quantity of cheap yet warm clothes not only in winter but also in the
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 50 (search)
475 B.C.When Dromocleides was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Marcus Fabius and Gnaeus Manlius. In this year the Lacedaemonians, now that for no good reason they had lost the command of the sea, were resentful; consequently they were incensed at the Greeks who had fallen away from them and continued to threaten them with the appropriate punishment. And when a meeting of the GerousiaThe Spartan Senate, composed of thirty members. was convened, they considered making war upon the Athenians for the sake of regaining the command of the sea. Likewise, when the general Assembly was convened, the younger men and the majority of the others were eager to recover the leadership, believing that, if they could secure it, they would enjoy great wealth, Sparta in general would be made greater and more powerful, and the estates of its private citizens would receive a great increase of prosperity. They kept calling to mind also the ancien
Pindar, Nemean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Nemean 3 For Aristocleides of Aegina Pancratium ?475 B. C. (search)
Nemean 3 For Aristocleides of Aegina Pancratium ?475 B. C. Queenly Muse, our mother! I entreat you, come in the sacred month of Nemea to the much-visited Dorian island of Aegina. For beside the waters of the Asopus young men are waiting, craftsmen of honey-voicedvictory-songs, seeking your voice. Various deeds thirst for various things; but victory in the games loves song most of all, the most auspicious attendant of garlands and of excellence. Send an abundance of it, from my wisdom;begin, divine daughter, an acceptable hymn to the ruler of the cloud-filled sky, and I will communicate it by the voices of those singers and by the lyre. The hymn will have a pleasant toil, to be the glory of the land where the ancient Myrmidons lived, whose marketplace, famous long ago,Aristocleides, through your ordinance, did not stain with dishonor by proving himself too weak in the strenuous course of the pancratium. But in the deep plain of Nemea, his triumph-song brings a healing cure for wearyi
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Caedi'cia Gens plebeian. A person of this name was a tribune of the plebs as early as B. C. 475, but the first of the gens who obtained the consulship was Q. Caedicius Noctua, in B. C. 289. The only cognomen occurring in this gens is NOCTUA: for those who have no surname, see CAEDICIUS. The name does not occur at all in the later times of the republic; but a Caedicius is mentioned twice by Juvenal (13.197, 16.46).
Caedi'cius 1. L. Caedicius, tribune of the plebs, B. C. 475, brought to trial Sp. Servilius Priscus Structus, the consul of the preceding year. (Liv. 2.52; Dionys. A. R. 9.28.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Publi'cola, Vale'rius 2. P. Valerius Volusi N. Publicola, P. F., son of the preceding, was consul for the first time B. C. 475, with C. Nautius Rutilus, conquered the Veientines and Sabines, and obtained a triumph in consequence. He was interrex in B. C. 462, and consul a second time in 460, with C. Claudius Sabinus Regillensis. In the latter year Publicola was killed in recovering the Capitol, which had been seized by Herdonius. The history of this event is related under HERDONIUS. (Liv. 2.52, 53, 15-19; Dionys. A. R. 9.28, 10.14-17.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ru'tilus, Nau'tius 2. C. NAUTILUS SP. F. SP. N. RUTILUS, probably brother of No. 1., was consul for the first time B. C. 475, with P. Valerius Publicola, and laid waste the territory of the Volscians, but was unable to bring them to a battle. He was consul a second time in B. C. 458, with L. Minucius Augurinus. While Rutilus carried on the war with success against the Sabines, his colleague Minucius was defeated by the Aequians; and Rutilus had to return to Rome to appoint L. Quintius Cincinnatus dictator. (Liv. 2.52, 3.25, 26, 29; Dionys. A. R. 9.28, 35, 10.22. 23, 25.)
for Simonides. [SIMONIDES.] (Allat. De Simeon. Scriptis, p. 200.) [J.C.M] Simon (*Si/mwn), a physician of Magnesia, who is mentioned by Herophilus (ap. Soran. De Arte Obstetr. p. 100), and who lived, therefore, in or before the fourth century B. C. He is probably the same person who is mentioned by Diogenes Laertius (2.123), and said by him to have lived in the time of Seleucus Nicanor. [W.A.G] Simon (*Si/mwn), of Aegina, a celebrated statuary in bronze, who flourished about Ol. 76, B. C. 475, and made one of the horses and one of the charioteers, in the group which was dedicated at Olympia by Phormis, the contemporary of Gelon and Hieron; the other horse and charioteer were made by DIONYSIUS of Argos (Paus. 5.27.1). Pliny states that he made a dog and an archer in bronze. (H. N. 34.8. s. 19.33.) He is also mentioned by Diogenes Laertius (2.123). To these passages should probably be added two others, in which the name of Simon is concealed by erroneous readings. Clemens Alexa
Simon (*Si/mwn), of Aegina, a celebrated statuary in bronze, who flourished about Ol. 76, B. C. 475, and made one of the horses and one of the charioteers, in the group which was dedicated at Olympia by Phormis, the contemporary of Gelon and Hieron; the other horse and charioteer were made by DIONYSIUS of Argos (Paus. 5.27.1). Pliny states that he made a dog and an archer in bronze. (H. N. 34.8. s. 19.33.) He is also mentioned by Diogenes Laertius (2.123). To these passages should probably be added two others, in which the name of Simon is concealed by erroneous readings. Clemens Alexandrinus (Protrept. p. 31, Sylburg) mentions, on the authority of Polemon, a statue of Dionysus Morychus, at Athens, made of the soft stone called fellei/ths, as the work of Sicon, the son of Eupalamus ; and the same statue is ascribed by Zenobius (5.13) to Simmias, the son of Eupalamus. We know nothing either of Sicon or of Simmias; but in the former passage nothing can be simpler than the correction
Sta'tia Gens This name appears to have been originally Lucanian or Samnite, for the Statii, mentioned before the time of Julius Caesar, all belong to the nations of southern Italy, with the solitary exception of T. Statius who is said to have been tribune of the plebs at Rome in B. C. 475. The Statii first acquired historical importance by the exploits of L. Statius Murcus, the legatus of Caesar, whose name appears on coins [MURCUS], but none of them obtained the consulship during the republican period, and the first person of the name who was raised to this honour was L. Statius Quadratus, in A. D. 142. The Statii bore several cognomens, which are given below.
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