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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 9 9 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 1 1 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 475 BC or search for 475 BC in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Caedi'cia Gens plebeian. A person of this name was a tribune of the plebs as early as B. C. 475, but the first of the gens who obtained the consulship was Q. Caedicius Noctua, in B. C. 289. The only cognomen occurring in this gens is NOCTUA: for those who have no surname, see CAEDICIUS. The name does not occur at all in the later times of the republic; but a Caedicius is mentioned twice by Juvenal (13.197, 16.46).
Caedi'cius 1. L. Caedicius, tribune of the plebs, B. C. 475, brought to trial Sp. Servilius Priscus Structus, the consul of the preceding year. (Liv. 2.52; Dionys. A. R. 9.28.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Publi'cola, Vale'rius 2. P. Valerius Volusi N. Publicola, P. F., son of the preceding, was consul for the first time B. C. 475, with C. Nautius Rutilus, conquered the Veientines and Sabines, and obtained a triumph in consequence. He was interrex in B. C. 462, and consul a second time in 460, with C. Claudius Sabinus Regillensis. In the latter year Publicola was killed in recovering the Capitol, which had been seized by Herdonius. The history of this event is related under HERDONIUS. (Liv. 2.52, 53, 15-19; Dionys. A. R. 9.28, 10.14-17.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ru'tilus, Nau'tius 2. C. NAUTILUS SP. F. SP. N. RUTILUS, probably brother of No. 1., was consul for the first time B. C. 475, with P. Valerius Publicola, and laid waste the territory of the Volscians, but was unable to bring them to a battle. He was consul a second time in B. C. 458, with L. Minucius Augurinus. While Rutilus carried on the war with success against the Sabines, his colleague Minucius was defeated by the Aequians; and Rutilus had to return to Rome to appoint L. Quintius Cincinnatus dictator. (Liv. 2.52, 3.25, 26, 29; Dionys. A. R. 9.28, 35, 10.22. 23, 25.)
for Simonides. [SIMONIDES.] (Allat. De Simeon. Scriptis, p. 200.) [J.C.M] Simon (*Si/mwn), a physician of Magnesia, who is mentioned by Herophilus (ap. Soran. De Arte Obstetr. p. 100), and who lived, therefore, in or before the fourth century B. C. He is probably the same person who is mentioned by Diogenes Laertius (2.123), and said by him to have lived in the time of Seleucus Nicanor. [W.A.G] Simon (*Si/mwn), of Aegina, a celebrated statuary in bronze, who flourished about Ol. 76, B. C. 475, and made one of the horses and one of the charioteers, in the group which was dedicated at Olympia by Phormis, the contemporary of Gelon and Hieron; the other horse and charioteer were made by DIONYSIUS of Argos (Paus. 5.27.1). Pliny states that he made a dog and an archer in bronze. (H. N. 34.8. s. 19.33.) He is also mentioned by Diogenes Laertius (2.123). To these passages should probably be added two others, in which the name of Simon is concealed by erroneous readings. Clemens Alexa
Simon (*Si/mwn), of Aegina, a celebrated statuary in bronze, who flourished about Ol. 76, B. C. 475, and made one of the horses and one of the charioteers, in the group which was dedicated at Olympia by Phormis, the contemporary of Gelon and Hieron; the other horse and charioteer were made by DIONYSIUS of Argos (Paus. 5.27.1). Pliny states that he made a dog and an archer in bronze. (H. N. 34.8. s. 19.33.) He is also mentioned by Diogenes Laertius (2.123). To these passages should probably be added two others, in which the name of Simon is concealed by erroneous readings. Clemens Alexandrinus (Protrept. p. 31, Sylburg) mentions, on the authority of Polemon, a statue of Dionysus Morychus, at Athens, made of the soft stone called fellei/ths, as the work of Sicon, the son of Eupalamus ; and the same statue is ascribed by Zenobius (5.13) to Simmias, the son of Eupalamus. We know nothing either of Sicon or of Simmias; but in the former passage nothing can be simpler than the correction
Sta'tia Gens This name appears to have been originally Lucanian or Samnite, for the Statii, mentioned before the time of Julius Caesar, all belong to the nations of southern Italy, with the solitary exception of T. Statius who is said to have been tribune of the plebs at Rome in B. C. 475. The Statii first acquired historical importance by the exploits of L. Statius Murcus, the legatus of Caesar, whose name appears on coins [MURCUS], but none of them obtained the consulship during the republican period, and the first person of the name who was raised to this honour was L. Statius Quadratus, in A. D. 142. The Statii bore several cognomens, which are given below.
Sta'tius 1. T. Statius, tribune of the Plebs, B. C. 475, in conjunction with his colleague L. Caecidius, brought an accusation against Sp. Servilius Priscus Structus, the consul of the preceding year. (Liv. 2.52.)
the above numbers ; but it appears better to be content with the general result, which they clearly establish, that Stesichorus flourished at the beginning and during the first part of the sixth century B. C. There appears, at first sight, to be a discrepancy between these testimonies and the statement of the Parian Marble (Ep. 51), that Stesichorus the poet came into Greece at the same time at which Aeschylus gained his first tragic victory, in the archonship of Philocrates, Ol. 73. 3, B. C. 475. But this statement refers, no doubt. to a later poet of the same name and family. That it cannot refer to the Stesichorus now under notice is proved, not only by the above testimonies, but also, as Bentley has shown, by the way in which Simonides mentions Stesichorus, in connection with Homer, as an ancient poet (Ath. iv. p. 172ef.); whereas, if the statement of the Marble applied to him, he must have been contemporary with Simonides. Still further light is thrown on this matter by anothe