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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 106 106 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 7 7 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 4 4 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White). You can also browse the collection for 48 BC or search for 48 BC in all documents.

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Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), THE CIVIL WARS, INTRODUCTION (search)
ose him. So he sent a proposal that both should retain their armies, so that neither need fear the other's enmity, or that Pompey should dismiss his forces also and live as a private citizen under the laws in like manner with him-self. Both requests being refused, he marched from Gaul against Pompey in the Roman territory, entered it, put him to flight, pursued him into Thessaly, won a brilliant Y.R. 706 victory over him in a great battle, and followed him to B.C. 48 Egypt. After Pompey had been slain by the Egyptians Cæsar set to work on the affairs of Egypt and remained there until he had settled the dynasty of that country. Then he returned to Rome. Having overpowered by war his principal rival, who had been surnamed the Great on account of his brilliant military exploits, he now ruled without disguise, nobody daring any longer to dispute him about anything, and was chosen, next after Sulla, dictator for life. A
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), BOOK II, CHAPTER VIII (search)
should lead on. Cæsar at once led, from the platform to the seashore, five legions of foot-soldiers and 600 chosen horse, but as a storm came up he was obliged to cast anchor. It was now the winter solstice and the wind kept him back, against his will, and held him in Brundusium, to his great disappointment, until the first day of the new Y.R. 706 year.Cæsar says that he sailed on the fourth day of January. In the meantime two more legions arrived and B.C. 48 Cæsar embarked these also and started in the winter time on merchant ships, for he had only a few war-ships and these were guarding Sardinia and Sicily. The ships were driven by the winds to the Ceraunian Mountains and Cæsar sent them back immediately to bring the rest of the army.Cæsar tells of another effort which he made for peace by sending Vibullius Rufus to Pompey with a proposal that both should disband their armies within three days. Pompey refused